Final Election Administration Plan

Executive Summary

Following the Orange County Board of Supervisors’ approval to transition to a vote center model, the Orange County Registrar of Voters (OCROV) created twelve internal working groups to develop procedures and policies for operating and conducting elections under the vote center model.

· Language Support

· Compliance

· Accessibility

· Site Selection

· Billing

· Ballot Drop Box

· Recruitment

· Training

· Equipment

· Logistics

· Public Meetings

· Communications


In addition to the research and work from the twelve internal working groups, we acknowledge and incorporate the feedback provided by thousands of voters and community advisory committees such as the OCROV’s advisory Community Elections Working Group (CEW), CEW subcommittee Language Accessibility Advisory Committee (LAAC), and the CEW subcommittee Voter Accessibility Advisory Committee (VAAC). We are also grateful for the support and guidance provided by the Secretary of State and the five counties who transitioned to the vote center model in 2018.

The Election Administration Plan (EAP) provides the foundation and guiding outline for the future of voting and elections in Orange County. Additionally, OCROV launched a website dedicated to informing the public about the upcoming changes and providing planning updates; the website can be accessed at ocvote.com/votecenter.

Following the finalization of the EAP, OCROV will implement a comprehensive Voter Education and Outreach Plan (VEOP) ranging from expanding our social media presence, partnerships with high schools and institutions of higher education, and collaborations with elected officials and government agencies. The plan is a framework for OCROV to meet its goal of informing Orange County’s 1.6 million voters of the upcoming changes and transition to the vote center model.

The first election under this new model will be the March 3, 2020 Presidential Primary Election, and we look forward to providing Orange County voters with more convenient and secure voting options and an improved voter experience through the vote center model. All registered voters will receive a vote-by-mail ballot and may opt to vote in-person at any vote center in Orange County.

At the time of preparing the EAP, approximately 188 vote centers and 110 ballot drop boxes are expected based on current voter counts and California Election Code requirements. Voters may also return their vote-by-mail ballot by mail without needing to affix additional postage, at a ballot drop box location, or at any vote center.

As Orange County transitions to the vote center model, my staff and I remain committed to our mission to provide election services for the citizens of Orange County to ensure equal access to the election process, protect the integrity of votes, and maintain a transparent, accurate and fair process.


Neal Kelley
Registrar of Voters
Orange County, CA

Neal Kelley Signature

Vote-By-Mail Ballots

  • 4005(a)(8)(A)

The implementation of the Voter’s Choice Act (VCA) in Orange County requires that every one of its 1.6 million registered voters receive a vote-by-mail (VBM) ballot. Orange County is prepared to handle the increase in volume of the printing, mailing, and processing of VBM ballots that will result from this new obligation. The new requirement supports the current voter behavior and projected trends, which the Orange County Registrar of Voters (OCROV) has already taken into consideration; moving to a hybrid vote-by-mail and in-person election is a matter of ramping up existing operations.

Background

In the November 2018 election, OCROV issued over 1.1 million VBM ballots to voters who specifically requested to receive their ballots by mail. The number of voters who request to receive ballots by mail has been steadily increasing since 2002, to the most recent level of 1.1 million ballots, or approximately 69% of the total registered voters. The rise of VBM requests has required us to increase capacity to mail and process ballots. This increased capacity, which has already been implemented, will allow processing VBM ballots for all voters in Orange County in 2020.

Ballot Printing

Unlike most California counties, Orange County prints in-house printed ballots for all voters. Ballots are currently printed on a high-speed, inkjet, web-press printer. The commercial state-of-the-art printer produces high quality images at a speed of 250 feet per minute, which allows for the accelerated printing of 1.6 million ballots in a relatively short amount of time.

Vote-by-Mail Ballot Preparation

OCROV currently operates its own mail inserting equipment, which inserts the correct ballot, instructions and return envelope into the VBM packet to be sent to voters. It also simultaneously prints the address and required voter information on both the outgoing and return envelopes for the voter. This technology can insert approximately 10,000 ballots per hour, allowing our office to prepare all 1.6 million ballots in an estimated time of two weeks.

Processing Returned Vote-by-Mail Ballots

OCROV currently operates its own high-speed mail sorting equipment that is used to process returned ballots. This equipment takes an image of every returned envelope, and tracks that the ballot has been returned. The images of the returned envelopes are used by staff to perform a signature comparison of the ballots and determine if the signature matches. This technology can process up to 45,000 pieces per hour, and the staff that check signatures can review approximately 10,000 signatures per hour. The speed of the mail sorting equipment, and its integration with the signature checking process, will allow OCROV to seamlessly handle the increased volume of returned VBM ballots.

Counting Returned Vote-by-Mail Ballots

The office is currently replacing its voting system and has planned to double the capacity for processing returned VBM ballots. The projected increase in returned VBM ballots has been factored into the purchase of necessary ballot scanning and counting equipment to process the returned VBM ballots in a timely manner.

Tracking Vote-by-Mail Ballots

An increase in the number of VBM ballots being sent is projected to increase the number of VBM ballots being returned. This will require an increase in service levels to be provided to voters. Anticipating that more voters will request the status of their VBM ballots, the office has added the ability for voters to track the status of their ballots online through a customized internal solution, OC Ballot Express. VBM ballots are tracked using a United States Postal Service barcode as they are mailed and returned to the office. Voters can go to the website and check the status of their ballots as it is sent and returned to our office. They can also see if their ballots have been verified and counted. This recently added ballot tracking capability will provide data to best respond to the increased level of service required by the additional VBM processing.

Vote Center and Ballot Drop Box Locations

  • 4005(a)(10)(B)

The VCA establishes detailed criteria and formulas for the placement and locations of vote centers and ballot drop boxes. Vote centers and ballot drop box locations will be decided based on specific considerations and requirements described below:

  • Proximity to public transportation
  • Proximity to communities with historically low vote-by-mail usage
  • Proximity to population centers
  • Proximity to language minority communities
  • Proximity to voters with disabilities
  • Proximity to communities with low rates of household vehicle ownership
  • Proximity to low-income communities
  • Proximity to geographically isolated populations
  • Access to accessible and free parking
  • The distance and time a voter must travel by car or public transportation
  • Traffic patterns

Vote Center Formula and Considerations

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(vi)(l)

The VCA has established a formula for determining the number of vote centers based on the number of registered voters. Counties are instructed to provide one 11-day vote center for every 50,000 registered voters and one 4-day vote center for every 10,000 registered voters. Based on the algorithm outlined in the VCA, the required minimum is 32 vote centers open for 11 days, including Election Day, and 161 vote centers that will be open for 4 days, including Election Day, in Orange County.

OCROV plans to provide more vote centers than the minimum requirements. Orange County will operate 38 vote centers open for 11 days, including Election Day, and 188 vote centers that will be open for 4 days, including Election Day, in Orange County. Expanding the number of vote centers will enable the placement of additional vote centers in isolated communities like Silverado and Trabuco Canyon.

Vote centers will open sequentially, with greater numbers of vote centers in operation as Election Day draws nearer. All vote centers will be in full operation during the last four days of voting, including Election Day. For eleven days, including Election Day, there will be 38 locations open throughout the County. The number of vote centers will increase for the last four day of voting with a total of 188 locations open throughout Orange County with expanded hours. 

Vote Center Minimum Requirements

Vote centers will be decided based on requirements as set forth in statute, the accessibility to voters with disabilities and language needs, location availability, and public feedback. OCROV will use voter and population data to select the best locations for vote centers.

OCROV will be identifying and assessing hundreds of potential facilities to ensure that locations are distributed throughout Orange County in a manner that provides greater access and convenience for all voters. 

Vote Center Site Selection Suitability Model

VCA requires counties to consider fourteen criteria when establishing vote centers. OCROV staff created a Vote Center Suitability Model, which brings together the most current available geospatial and demographic data, to consider all required criteria. The Vote Center Suitability Model uses an interactive mapping tool that allows the user to search for and evaluate any proposed location against all required criteria (see Vote Center and Ballot Drop Box Mapping Tool on page 14). 

While the Vote Center Suitability Model provides a quick and effective way to assess proposed locations against the required criteria, it does not automatically define where vote center locations will be finalized.

Vote Center Assessment Matrix

In addition to considering required criteria, a Vote Center Assessment Matrix is used to consider many of the other site selection elements that, while not required by law, impact the vote center siting process. Some examples of these site selection elements include parking availability, size of the voting room, the presence of adequate lighting, both inside and outside, and the geographic area of the proposed site.

Vote Center Facility Recruitment Process

Past polling places from previous elections were reviewed and assessed if they would meet minimum requirements for a vote center. Locations that would not be able to accommodate vote center operations, such as private residences and locations under 800 square feet, were contacted to inform them of the transition to a new voting model and thank them for their past service. The remaining facilities were moved forward to next level of review in the recruitment process.

Facility Research

Based on the previous facility recruitment process, a list of 200 polling places was compiled to be further reviewed and contacted to serve as possible vote centers.

Non-public facilities were contacted for further discussion on availability and potential costs. Public facilities were contacted to schedule appointments to view potential vote center locations.

Concurrent with past polling place research, each city was evaluated, and every public facility and property was added to a master list for further research. Additionally, based off of population data, each city has been evaluated for a targeted number of vote centers, and new city facilities that have not served as polling places are being contacted for vote center site evaluations.

List of Potential Vote Centers with Days and Hours of Operation

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(vi)(III), §4005(a)(10)(l)(vi)(VI)

OCROV is currently in the process of identifying potential vote centers and conducting site assessments and accessibility surveys. Vote center locations will be selected in conjunction with public feedback and the requirements as necessitated by law. The final list of selected vote centers will be included in the Voter Information Guide (VIG) and will be available on the OCROV’s website, ocvote.com. 

Starting ten days before Election Day, select vote centers will be open during regular business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. All vote centers will be open 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. during the last few days of voting, and 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. on Election Day. See page 81 in Appendices for the 11 Day and 4 Day Locations Table at the time of publishing. OCROV will publish a list of vote centers at ocvote.com/votecenter.

Map of Potential Vote Centers

Potential Vote Center Map

Vote Center Layout

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(vi)(XI)

The voting experience at a vote center is similar to voting at a traditional polling place; however, vote centers offer voters enhanced services and benefits that are more secure and convenient. All vote centers will be equipped with multiple electronic check-in stations that will allow vote center staff to verify the identity of the voter quickly and easily. At vote centers, a voter will be able to:

  • Vote in-person or drop off a vote-by-mail ballot;
  • Use an accessible ballot marking device that allows voters with disabilities to vote independently;
  • Get a replacement ballot;
  • Get language assistance; and
  • Register to vote or update registration information.

OCROV will implement vote center layout guidelines to ensure all voting equipment is placed in a manner that allows a voter to mark their ballot independently and privately. Layouts will be sensitive to the accessibility needs of voters and will be adjusted to accommodate the varying shapes and room sizes of each location (see page 80 in Appendices for a sample layout).

Number of Vote Center Employees

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(vi)(IX)

The projected need for vote center employees is based on the number of 11-day and 4-day vote centers, the number of check-in stations in relation to the anticipated capacity of a vote center and a schedule that supports a variety of shifts. Estimates of the number of required vote center employees are calculated based on an average of seven staff needed at any vote center. The average considers that there may be differences in the number of required staff at any given vote center.

Vote Center Type

Shift Type

Projected Need by Shift

11 Day

Full Shift

38 x 5 =

190

4 Day

Full Shift

150 x 3 =

450

11 Day

Partial Shift

38 x 4 =

152

4 Day

Partial Shift

150 x 8 =

1,200

Total Projected Need

1,992

Ballot Drop Box Formula and Considerations

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(vi)(II)

The VCA requires counties to provide at least one ballot drop box location for every 15,000 registered voters. Voter registration data was analyzed to determine the estimated number of ballot drop boxes needed in each city and unincorporated areas. OCROV is planning on placing 110 ballot drop boxes throughout Orange County.

Minimum criteria are being considered and evaluated while researching any potential ballot drop box location. Ballot drop box sites that will best provide voters with additional options to securely and conveniently drop off their ballots are being considered. Best efforts are being made to identify locations with existing security camera coverage in different areas than vote center sites and post offices.

Ballot Drop Box Minimum Requirements

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(vi)(VI)

In addition to the VCA minimum requirements, the California Secretary of State (SOS) provides additional regulations such as accessibility and language requirements. Ballot drop boxes have been designed to provide translated legal language included in the graphics of the ballot drop box. OCROV is evaluating the possibility of adding additional features to support voters with disabilities, such as content in Braille or tactile directional signage, and will work with disability community partners to research best practices for future consideration. The viability of a potential location is also dependent on meeting minimum accessibility requirements as determined by a detailed assessment.

OCROV will ensure all ballot drop boxes are open to the public 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Ballot drop boxes are designed to be placed outdoors, in public locations and preventative security measures will be undertaken such as anti-vandalism coating as well as a potential mechanism for fire suppression.

Ballot Drop Box Suitability Model

OCROV staff created a Ballot Drop Box Suitability Model, which brings together the most current available geospatial and demographic data, to consider all required criteria. The Ballot Drop Box Suitability Model is an interactive mapping tool that allows the user to search for and evaluate any proposed location against all required criteria and specific regulations (see Vote Center and Ballot Drop Box Mapping Tool on page 14). 

While the Ballot Drop Box Suitability Model provides a quick and effective way to assess proposed locations against the required criteria, it does not automatically define where ballot drop box locations will be finalized.

Ballot Drop Box Assessment Matrix

In addition to considering the required criteria, a Ballot Drop Box Assessment Matrix is used to consider many of the other site selection elements that, while not required by law, impact the siting process. Some examples of these site selection elements include, presence of an onsite security camera, availability of short term/temporary parking spaces for the ballot collection team, and the presence of adequate lighting at the proposed site.

Ballot Drop Box Location Recruitment Process

An informational marketing packet has been developed which includes a letter from Registrar of Voters Neal Kelley and an informational ballot drop box flyer on specifications, expectations, and frequently asked questions. The packet will be used to outreach to potential sites to provide detailed information about the ballot drop box process. The packet will include a ballot drop box agreement so that all parties have a clear understanding of roles and obligations.

Previous polling places were reviewed to determine if the location could support a ballot drop box on site. Working concurrently with potential vote center site selections, different potential ballot drop box locations have been identified that will provide additional options for voters. In addition, research has been conducted on potential city sites, libraries, and other publicly available locations. Well-known retail shopping centers and privately-owned properties have also been identified as possible locations. All potential ballot drop box locations are being further reviewed. Similar to the vote center recruitment process, cities and areas that have the largest need for ballot drop boxes are being prioritized.

Every potential site will undergo a site assessment to determine suitability and accessibility. Once the site is fully reviewed, final determinations will be made on the potential location of any placement. This will require working with the site tenant, property management company and/or property owner for approval.

List of Potential Ballot Drop Boxes with Days and Hours of Operation

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(vi)(IV), §4005(a)(10)(l)(vi)(VII)

OCROV is currently in the process of identifying potential ballot drop box locations and conducting site assessments and accessibility surveys. Ballot drop box locations will be selected in conjunction with public feedback and the requirements as necessitated by law. The final list of selected ballot drop boxes will be included in the VIG and will be available on the OCROV’s website at ocvote.com. 

All ballot drop boxes will be open 30 days (including Election Day) and are available 24/7 until 8:00 p.m. on Election Day. See page 81 in Appendices for Ballot Drop Box Locations Table at the writing of publishing. OCROV will publish a list of ballot drop boxes at ocvote.com/votecenter.

Map of Potential Ballot Drop Boxes

Map of Potential Ballot Dropboxes

Vote Center and Ballot Drop Box Mapping Tool

To assist with selecting sites for vote centers and ballot drop boxes, the agency’s GIS division has created a suitability model and web mapping tool. Using a framework of guidelines designated by SB 450, data-specific criteria determined by OCROV staff, and Geographic Information System (GIS) technology, a suitability model was produced to grade the degree of suitability for all areas in Orange County to host vote centers and ballot drop box locations. 

To accomplish this, a grid array of cells was created to cover the entire County, and then populated these grid cells with spatial data related to the requirements set forth by SB 450. Data were gathered from a variety of public entities and covers topics such as transportation, population density, voter registration and voting patterns, language requests, disabilities, and income. OCROV staff analyzed all of the data and requirements and created a ranking system to set priorities within the SB 450 requirements list. Once priority needs were determined, we created an algorithm that compiled all of the data and generated a “score” for each grid cell in the County. The resulting “score” is being used as a baseline to determine priority of need for the locations of vote centers and ballot drop boxes throughout the County.

To further assist with the process, an interactive web mapping tool was created to display the layers of data used to meet the SB 450 requirements, the resulting grid cell array with their “scores”, and potential vote center and ballot drop box locations based off of archived polling places, public infrastructure, and community sites. The tool allows exploring the existing data, proposing new sites, tracking the progress of the site selection process, and making informed decisions.

Methodology

Using guidelines created by SB 450, data-specific criteria determined by OCROV staff, and GIS technology, produce a suitability model to represent the degree of suitability in fulfillment of all mandated criteria for all areas in the County to host vote centers and ballot drop box locations.

  • Create a 500’ grid array that divides the County into discrete areas of a consistent size. The grid cell size was determined by analyzing the spatial resolution of available data, the total surface area of the county, and the desired level of granularity for analysis by OCROV staff.
  • Overlay and spatially join voter registration records, demographic data, and infrastructure data to the grid to create a standardized array of data.
  • Create a system for data values within each layer of data to specify a way to identify high, medium and low fulfillment of criteria to inform vote center facility recruitment.

Site Selection Suggestion Form on Website

Another way vote center and ballot drop box locations are selected for assessment is public feedback received through the vote center website online Site Suggestion Form ocvote.com/votecenter. This allows the public to provide a facility name, address, and a reason for suggesting a location. OCROV continues to follow up on the extensive feedback on vote centers and ballot drop box locations.

Services for Voters with Disabilities

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(vi)(X)

Orange County is committed to supporting voters with disabilities through the transition to vote centers. OCROV will expand and update services for voters with disabilities such as using an updated comprehensive accessibility survey, a voting system with current accessibility supported technology and extending the ability to cast a ballot independently from home.

Updated Accessibility Survey

  • 4005(a)(4)(C)

In order to comply with the additional accessibility requirements, the SOS Accessibility Checklist was reviewed, and additional requirements were added to the OCROV Polling Place Survey to create the Orange County Registrar of Voters Vote Center Survey. In compliance, the update focused on a more in-depth examination of paths of travel from public transportation, seeking sites with a maximum number of accessible parking spaces, and additional questions to differentiate between types of curb ramps.

The past survey was also reviewed to ensure that all questions on the current survey are in compliance with the SOS Accessibility Checklist and the requirements in the VCA. The format of the OCROV Vote Center Survey was also updated from previous paper versions and outdated electronic versions to an application-based program that can be used on a mobile electronic device.

Information for Services for Voters with Disabilities included in VIGs and VBM Instructions

  • 4005(a)(8)(B)(i)(IV)

The VIG will include information on how voters with disabilities can request assistance, Disability Rights California’s Voting Hotline phone number, and how to contact OCROV for any general questions. Additionally, the VIG will specify that a voter unable to mark a ballot may bring up to two individuals to assist with voting. The VIG will also include a postcard with prepaid postage for voters to request a remote accessible VBM ballot.

The VBM instructions will inform voters that there is the availability of requesting election materials in an accessible format.

Accessible Information Posted to Website

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(i)(IV), §4005(a)(8)(B)(ii)

The OCROV website provides information to all voters in an accessible format. Special attention has been given to the design of the website to ensure that it is responsive, compatible with screen readers and easy to navigate.

The website provides voters with information relating to the election process, registering to vote, VCA legislation, and the Election Administration Plan (EAP). The website will also provide information about services available to voters with disabilities, including:

  • Vote center and ballot drop box accessibility
  • Ballot marking devices
  • Resources for voters with disabilities
  • Requesting a remote accessible VBM ballot

The website will include information on the types of services available to voters with disabilities, what services can be accessed at vote centers, and more. It will also include a list of vote centers and ballot drop boxes in an accessible format.

How a Voter with Disabilities may request a VBM, RAVBM, or Replacement Ballot

  • 4005(a)(5), §4005(a)(10)(l)(ii)

With the move to vote centers, a person with a disability can request a VBM, RAVBM, or replacement ballot via the website, through email, over the phone, in written form, or in person at the OCROV office. In addition to these options, voters will also be able to request a VBM or a replacement ballot in person at any vote center and request a RAVBM through the postage-paid postcard included with every VIG.


Remote Accessible Vote-By-Mail

  • 4005(a)(8)(B)(i)(IV)

Orange County registered voters with disabilities may request a downloadable ballot by connecting to the Remote Accessible Vote-By-Mail (RAVBM) system. RAVBM provides voters with disabilities the ability to request a VBM ballot to be sent electronically. The electronic ballot can be downloaded to the voter’s computer, marked using the voter’s own assistive technology and then printed. This ballot can then be returned in the same manner as any VBM ballot; through the mail, placed in a ballot drop box; or at any vote center. Voters will be provided instructions to return the completed RAVBM ballot in the supplied return envelope in the VBM packet.

OCROV is in the process of selecting a RAVBM vendor and a final decision has not been made yet.

Type and Number of Accessible Voting Machines

  • 4005(a)(2)(B), §4005(a)(4)(D), §4005(a)(10)(l)(vi)(X)

All Orange County vote centers will be equipped with a minimum of three accessible ballot marking devices (up to five in many cases) and will be flexible to expand the number of devices dependent on the voting room size and voter needs.

A voter will be able to mark their ballot using the touch screen display, audio tactile device, or their own assistive technology. The accessible ballot marking devices will provide voters with disabilities an autonomous voting experience. Ballot marking devices will be arranged to allow all voters the opportunity to cast their ballot privately and independently.

Type and Number of Reasonable Modifications at Vote Centers

  • 4005(a)(6)(D), §4005(a)(10)(l)(vi)(X)

There are multiple types of reasonable modifications that will be offered inside vote centers. Electronic check-in, minimum standard of three accessible voting machines (up to five in most locations, dependent on available square footage), and physical modifications will be in place to support voters with disabilities.

Electronic check-in will allow those voters with disabilities the option to sign the roster independently and accessibility features on the electronic devices will allow for screen-reading, magnification, and inverted colors for those with visual disabilities. Magnifiers will be available upon request, and chairs will be available at check-in stations and at the accessible voting units upon request. If a voter needs additional assistance, vote center employees will be available to assist a voter as a visual guide through the voting room, or to read out any information they may not be able to see.

In addition to modifications upon request, each vote center will be surveyed for accessibility. If needed, facilities may be provided with threshold ramps for short rises to enter rooms, cones to identify hazards, and mats to cover slipping hazards. Most facilities will be asked leave doors to the voting room open for accessibility. Occasionally, a facility may provide a ballot call device which a voter is able to use to request curbside voting without entering the vote center; this will depend on the terrain of the location.

Toll-Free Voter Phone Line

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(vii)

The public will be provided a toll-free voter phone line to direct voters to the accessibility features in order to ask questions and receive voting and election-related information. The toll-free phone number will be published on OCROV website, public service announcements, and provided in media outreach and direct voter contact information including the VIG.

Voters that are deaf, hard of hearing, or speech-disabled may use the California Relay Service (CRS) by dialing 711 to use the telephone system via a text telephone (TTY) or other device to call OCROV’s Toll-Free Voter Phone Line. CRS supports the following modes of communication: TTY, VCO, 2LVCO, HCO, STS, VASTS, ASCII, or Voice.

Video Conferencing

OCROV will provide American Sign Language interpretation assistance via video conferencing at all vote centers.

Language Assistance Services

OCROV is nationally recognized as a leader in providing comprehensive and innovative language assistance services to voters. From having dedicated bilingual staff prepare culturally appropriate translations and maintaining an extensive event calendar, OCROV is committed to providing numerous opportunities for language communities to learn about the transition to vote centers.

Translated Reference Ballots and Language Assistance Card

  • 13400

Per California Elections Code §14201, OCROV is required to provide translated reference ballots at targeted precincts and a card indicating that translated reference ballots in Tagalog and Farsi (Persian) are available at targeted precincts.

The targeted precincts are identified, and the corresponding ballot types are translated by a contracted vendor per requirements under §13307. In the vote center model, a translated reference ballot will be posted at every vote center and copies will be available as a reference guide for voters who request it. In addition to receiving a translated reference ballot at a vote center, voters may also request a translated reference ballot by telephone, mail, or fax up to 10 days before Election Day.

Orange County provides an inclusive language assistance card, which not only lists the availability of translated reference ballots but all language services available at vote centers. Asian Americans Advancing Justice – Los Angeles described OCROV’s language assistance card as “a best practice on how to provide language assistance signage for all counties.”[1] Currently, the card is in a paper format and OCROV is exploring electronic formats. See page 53 in Appendices for a sample language assistance card.

Language Assistance Services included in VIGs or VBM instructions and Website

  • 4005(a)(8)(B)

Voters will be notified of their ability to request translated election materials and language assistance services in the VIG and VBM instructions.

The website will provide the complete list of language assistance services. Currently, OCROV utilizes ocvote.com/language to provide information on language assistance services under the polling place model. Prior to the March 2020 Election, this webpage will be updated to reflect language assistance services available under the vote center model.

Bilingual Vote Center Staffing and Supported Languages

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(vi)(IX)

OCROV will determine which vote centers are located in or adjacent to a precinct that meets language requirements under the federal Voting Rights Act (VRA) for in-person language assistance. In addition, OCROV will solicit public input regarding which vote centers should be staffed by individuals who are fluent in specific languages, pursuant to subdivision (c) of §12303 and §203 of the federal Voting Rights Act (VRA). Every effort will be made to recruit and assign bilingual vote center staff to these vote centers.

At vote centers identified as meeting language assistance requirements, voters will still have alternate options to receive effective in-language assistance such as translated written materials, assistance over a telephone call, and assistance through video conferencing.

Toll-Free Voter Phone Line and Multilingual Public Phone Bank

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(vii), §4005(a)(10)(l)(i)(I)

Leading up to Election Day, OCROV operates a public phone bank that is staffed with bilingual operators in federal and state required languages to assist voters with questions before, during, and after an election to provide in-language assistance. Language voters may also call a toll-free voter phone line to ask questions and receive voting and election-related information. The toll-free phone number is 1-888-628-6837 and it has been activated. It will be published on OCROV website, public service announcements, and provided in media outreach and direct voter contact information including the VIG. There will be one toll-free number to serve the public, including language communities.

Video Conferencing

To supplement in-person support to voters requesting language assistance, OCROV will be debuting video conferencing to provide multilingual assistance at all vote centers. This will ensure that voters needing language assistance will be able to interact with trained bilingual staff who can verbally and visually guide the voter to meaningfully participate in the voting process, even if there is not bilingual staff at the vote center. Staff are currently researching vendors and equipment needed to provide this service; a pilot program is scheduled to take place prior to the March 2020 Election. Telephone support will also be available depending on the preference of the requesting voter.

Supported languages include:

  • Spanish
  • Vietnamese
  • Chinese
  • Korean
  • Farsi (Persian)
  • Tagalog
  • American Sign Language

Voting Technology

Electronic Poll Books

Electronic poll books directly replace paper rosters and provide a mechanism to ensure the efficient and secure processing of eligible voters at any vote center location. They accomplish secure processing by having a protected and encrypted real-time batched connection to the election database to send and receive voter status updates.

An electronic pollbook solution chosen by OCROV is a combination of tablet hardware devices and vendor proprietary software. The voter information resides in and is used by the electronic poll book, and is password protected and encrypted whether the data is at rest or in transit. In addition to the communication between electronic poll books, the OCROV electronic poll book data server is transmitted over a secured high-speed wireless broadband network built specifically for protecting sensitive data. OCROV has selected and contracted with a vendor to provide electronic poll books for the vote center operations.

Voting System

The effort to replace Orange County’s current voting system began in 2013 due to the decreasing usable equipment and the lack of allowable modifications in a highly regulated environment.

In addition to the requirement that voting systems must be certified by the State of California, internal strict extensive security requirements have been developed and were included in the Request for Proposals for procurement of a new voting system. The internal requirements covered technical aspects of the voting system as well as organizational requirements for responsive vendors. Encrypted data, the ability to detect tampering, and the ability to meet security standards are examples of the requirements that have been included in the Request for Proposal for any new voting system.

OCROV entered into a contract with Hart InterCivic as a voting system solution for vote center operations and equipment is being procured in 2019.

Voting Security

OCROV has been aggressively pursuing security measures to protect the integrity of our elections by paying attention to issues related to ballot integrity, voter registration systems, and ensuring the eligibility of voters. Although threats are constantly changing and incidents are unique, there are best practices to prepare for threats and incidents. OCROV continues to improve our current systems and implement new sets of standards. OCROV has implemented physical and cybersecurity controls while incorporating extensive training for employees. There are also classified security measures in place to ensure that these mitigation efforts are not compromised.

Security and Contingency Plans to Ensure Prevention of Disruption

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(vi)(VIII)(ia)

OCROV has a multi-pronged approach to ensure prevention of disruption to election operations through partnerships, internal controls, and procedures.

State, Federal, Local Partnerships

We have developed a relationship with our Orange County’s Chief Information Security office, and the Orange County Intelligence Assessment Center (OCIAC). We also have a direct relationship with Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Election Assistance Commission (EAC).

There is increased collaboration around election cycles before and after the election. We enhance our security awareness and communication, including regular meetings with the County’s security office, DHS, and the FBI.

Internal Controls

From a technical perspective, OCROV includes a multi-layered approach to ensure the data remains encrypted and secured at all times. Devices that have Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) certified components will be utilized and data will remain encrypted from point-to-point at all times. Physical security is also a consideration when choosing a location to host a vote center. Only facilities that provide adequate physical security will be chosen.

Mobile device management allows total control of securing and enforcing policies to tablets, smartphones, and other devices. Mobile device management allows for the ability to remotely wipe a device, use password enforcement, enable application whitelisting or blacklisting, use data encryption enforcement, control application distribution and software updates, and more.

Every vote center will have a smartphone for notification in the event of an emergency. Vote center staff will also receive a handbook on what procedures to follow should there be an emergency. Voting equipment will have battery back-up in the event there is a loss of power.

Procedures, Methods and Standards

Chain of custody procedures are used as an administrative control as part of the overall strategy to secure election operations. The chain of custody procedures ensures that physical tracking of voting system equipment is in place.

Voting system components are secured within a secure location requiring badge access until deployed for the election. Voting devices are placed in numerically sealed transportation containers. Memory devices are numerically sealed in the voting systems. All voting equipment is tracked when deployed and returned to the OCROV.

Election personnel sign chain of custody documents for voting equipment at distribution locations. Election personnel and vote center staff will be required to check the security seals periodically and report any broken seals or suspicious activity. An OCROV representative signs for equipment upon its return. Voting equipment is inventoried and placed in a secured location.

Security and Contingency Plans to Ensure Continuation of Election in Event of Disruption

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(vi)(VIII)(ib)

OCROV has taken extensive preparations to prevent disruptions in the elections process; however, it is equally important to be prepared to respond to the real possibility of an incident or disruption. This section outlines the steps taken to be prepared to continue elections operations in the event of a disruption.

Vote Center Response During the Voting Period

During the voting period, election support personnel are located throughout Orange County, ready to respond to any incident. These field personnel have replacement voting equipment and supplies and are trained to handle technical issues. The response time of these support personnel will typically be less than 15 minutes. Field personnel can also respond to loss of power at a vote center location with mobile electric generators. Vote center employees have emergency contact information, including a dedicated helpdesk that can quickly resolve issues, or dispatch a member of the support team in the field.

All vote center equipment functions independently and is implemented with the ability to operate without connection to the Internet. Each piece of voting equipment does not directly communicate with other voting equipment, and if one piece of equipment stops functioning, all of the other voting equipment continues to operate.

Incident Response Plan

OCROV has an in-depth Incident Response Plan that can be used in the event of a cybersecurity incident, outage or attack. This plan provides a systematic way to identify, address and recover from an incident.

Critical processes and their associated information technology dependencies have been identified to ensure ongoing elections operations in the event of a disruption. It provides a framework for determining critical business processes and enabling the organization to survive the loss of part or all of our operational capabilities.

The communications flowchart below depicts how information will be disseminated to voters, staff, and media outlets during a disruption. Delegations of authority have been set to avoid misinformation, make policy determinations, and decisions for functional areas of the department as appropriate.

A comprehensive Incident Response Plan has been created and will be updated under the vote center model, outlining response strategies for a variety of possible scenarios.

Methods and Standards

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(iv)

The purpose of the Incident Response Plan is to allow elections operations to continue in the event of a disaster, an incident or a service disruption. By identifying the procedures for critical processes, communications, and alternate facilities, most foreseeable disruptions to elections operations can be mitigated.

Critical Processes

The plan identifies all critical processes required to run an election. Each of these critical processes is analyzed, and the technical dependencies for each of those processes are determined. For each of those technical dependencies, a recovery strategy is defined, including the restoration of required data. As an example, providing vote center support is one of the many critical election processes identified. In order to provide support to vote centers, employees need access to a database with vote center information and contact information. Therefore, the Incident Response Plan requires that there is a backup of that database and a strategy to be able to restore the data in a reasonable amount of time to continue operations.

Communications

The Incident Response Plan also addresses modes of communication, and how communication can continue during a disruption. This includes alternate modes of communication in the case that primary systems fail. Responsibilities are assigned for disseminating information, and key stakeholders with whom it will be required to communicate in the event of a disruption. The process that is disrupted determines with whom the communication needs to occur. For example, some disruptions will require communication to only vote center staff, while other disruptions may require communication to the media and general public.

Alternate Facilities

Alternate facilities are designated for local disasters, such as fires, floods, or other situations that would now allow access to our main facilities. Mobile voting units could be deployed to serve as supplemental or replacement voting locations.

Fiscal Impact

The replacement of voting system complicates the comparison of short-term and long-term costs and savings. OCROV’s voting system has reached its end of life after more than 15 years of successful elections.

Estimates of Short-Term and Long-Term Savings

  • 4005(a)(10)(I)(v)

The following tables show a comparison of costs of licensing and maintenance of the existing and new voting systems, and the costs to purchase a new system in both a polling place model election and a vote center model election.

Voting system licensing and maintenance costs:

Fiscal Year 2016/2017

Fiscal Year 2017/2018

Fiscal Year 2018/2019

Fiscal Year 2019/2020

(proposed budget)

2018 Voting System

$730,000

$595,000

$595,000

$50,000

New Voting System

$15,395,592

New voting system estimated costs for both polling place and vote center elections:

Election Type

# Sites/# Accessible Units (includes growth)

One-time Equipment Purchase (estimated)

Polling Place Model

900 / 1200

$23,400,000–$40,000,000

Vote Center Model

188 / 940

$8,537,550–$14,177,550

Cost Difference

$14,862,450-$25,822,450

Overview of Voter Education and Outreach Plan

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(i), §4005(a)(10)(l)(i)(VI)

OCROV is committed to cultivating new relationships with community organizations and stakeholders, as well as strengthening our existing relationships with community partners during the transition to the vote center model. 

In 2020, OCROV will continue to participate in events that have been historically attended, as well as develop creative and more effective ways of communicating to voters. This Voter Education and Outreach Plan (VEOP) will highlight outreach events the organization will coordinate and attend, outline new messaging strategies that will increase our presence in the community, and detail how resources will be allocated more efficiently through the analysis of key data points.

Summary of Goals

  • Roadshow to Vote Centers 2020 presentations
  • Vote center workshops
  • 50 large community engagement events
  • 100 small-to-medium community engagement events
  • Pop-up voting in March 2020 and November 2020 Elections
  • Partnerships with colleges and universities
  • Partnerships with high schools
  • 2-4 direct voter contacts
  • A suite of over 70 produced videos
  • Increased social media presence

Community Partners

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(i)(III)

Successfully maintaining a community outreach program includes maintaining established partnerships with community-based groups/organizations. OCROV meets with dedicated individuals from various organizations across Orange County including: advocacy groups, civic groups, citizen leagues, senior centers, churches, and other individuals. These relationships have begun as far back as 1998 and the number of organizations continues to grow each year.

Community Election Working Group

The Community Election Working Group (CEW) is a diverse 25-member community advisory board committed to making sure elections are open and accessible. Since its inception in 2009, quarterly CEW meetings have been conducted which have cultivated valuable input from the community regarding the elections process. The advisory group also provides a forum for OCROV to update the community as a whole on election issues and promote community involvement.

Membership includes, but is not limited to, representation from the Latino community, Asian community, City Clerks, League of Women Voters, Republican Party, Democratic Party, alternative parties, senior community, veterans community, disabled community, youth population (voters ages 18 to 25) and at-large positions.

CEW Subcommittee Voting Accessibility Advisory Committee & Language Accessibility Advisory Committees

  • 4005(a)(9)(A), §4005(a)(9)(B), §4005(a)(10)(l)(i)(I)

Implemented in early 2017, the CEW Subcommittee Voting Accessibility Advisory Committee (VAAC) and the CEW Subcommittee Language Accessibility Advisory Committee (LAAC) are two independent committees of the CEW that designated to focus on the needs of voters with disabilities and language minority communities.

The mission of the LAAC is to advise and assist the OCROV with implementation of federal and state laws relating to language access, so that all voters can meaningfully participate in the voting process. The LAAC also provides recommendations identifying and prioritizing activities, programs, and policies to ensure equal access to the ballot. The responsibilities of the committee include the following: providing expertise on language accessibility issues; promoting language accessibility initiatives; and responding to the OCROV’s questions regarding language support.

The mission of the VAAC is to advise and assist the OCROV with providing services to voters with accessibility needs and meeting state and federal requirements, so all opportunities to provide equal access are explored. The VAAC also provides recommendations identifying and prioritizing activities, programs, and policies to ensure voters with disabilities can independently cast a ballot. The responsibilities of the committee include the following: providing expertise on accessibility matters; incorporating accessibility procedures into operations; and providing feedback to the OCROV regarding accessibility standards and outreaching to voters with accessibility needs.

CEW and subcommittees LAAC and VAAC meeting agendas and a list of members and supporting organizations for each group can be found starting on page 63 in Appendices. Language community partners and disability community partners are listed starting on page 52 in Appendices.

Voter Education Workshops for Language Communities

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(i)(VI)(ia)

Following the final publication of the EAP, OCROV will host multiple voter education workshops to provide vote center and election information for each of Orange County’s federal and state required languages. In 2020, these languages will include Spanish, Vietnamese, Chinese, Korean, Farsi (Persian), and Tagalog.

Each workshop will include information about the vote center model, voting equipment demonstrations, language assistance services, ballot drop-off options, and methods to request translated election materials. Information about the workshops will be announced at least 10 days in advance of the date and will be shared with the LAAC and language community organizations.

OCROV will partner with CEW LAAC and its language community partners to determine the number of workshops, workshop dates, times, and locations, and what materials to distribute to best serve voters with language needs.

Methods to Identify Language Communities

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(i)(V)

OCROV utilizes the number of voters who request language assistance through voter registration forms. Voters may also notify OCROV of their language preference via telephone, fax, email or online to update their language preference. Sources such as the United States Census Bureau help identify areas where there may be communities that have limited-English proficiency and may need language assistance.

In addition, OCROV receives input from language community partners on the geographic distribution of where language communities exist in Orange County.

Toll-Free Voter Phone Line and Multilingual Public Phone Bank

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(vii), §4005(a)(10)(l)(i)(I)

Leading up to Election Day, OCROV operates a public phone bank that is staffed with bilingual operators in federal and state required languages to assist voters with questions before, during, and after an election to provide in-language assistance. Language voters may also call a toll-free voter phone line to ask questions and receive voting and election-related information. The toll-free phone number is 1-888-628-6837 and it has been activated. It will be published on OCROV website, public service announcements, and provided in media outreach and direct voter contact information including the VIG. There will be one toll-free number to serve the public, including language communities.

Voter Education Workshop for Disability Community

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(i)(VI)(ib)

Following the final publication of the EAP, OCROV will host multiple voter education workshops to increase accessibility and participation of eligible voters with disabilities. The workshop will include education about the vote center model, voting equipment demonstrations, the accessibility of the voting equipment, ballot drop-off information, and options for obtaining an electronically accessible vote-by-mail ballot.

OCROV will partner with CEW VAAC and its disability community partners to determine the number of workshops, workshop dates, times, and locations, and what materials to distribute to best serve voters with disabilities. Possibilities include developing instructional and informational videos on topics such as RAVBM and available services for voters with disabilities at vote centers.

Information about the workshop events will be announced at least 10 days in advance of the date and it will be shared with the VAAC and disability community organizations.

Remote Accessible Vote-By-Mail Outreach

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(i)(II)

OCROV will develop an outreach plan to inform voters on the availability of RAVBM in partnership with CEW VAAC. Different strategies will be created based on the target audience and best practices on how to reach them. This will be implemented as a part of the larger overall media strategy for informing and engaging voters leading up to the March 3, 2020 Presidential Primary Election.

High Schools

OCROV has strong relationships with high schools through its award-winning MyBallot program. The MyBallot program provides high school students a history of voting and interactive opportunities to learn about ballot generation, administering a student election with official voting equipment, and overseeing tabulation of election results. Since its inception in 2010, over 4,000 students from 22 high schools participated and gained a better understanding of the election process and voting.

The MyBallot program was developed with the traditional polling place model and will be reimagined with the transition to the vote center model. OCROV will leverage its existing relationships with high schools to provide pre-registration opportunities, information on how elections are conducted under the vote center model, and voter registration training.

Colleges and Universities

There are approximately 28 colleges and universities with campuses in Orange County. OCROV has built relationships with colleges and universities through hosting tabling events on campus where voting and election information is provided, voter registration training to student organizations, and speaking engagements during classes and at student club meetings.

Additionally, OCROV has brought its Mobile Community Engagement Unit and Pop-Up Mobile Voting Unit to college and university campuses with redesigned marketing collateral to draw the attention of students, faculty, and staff. Examples include hosting Pop-Up Mobile Voting at Saddleback College, Golden West College, California State University at Fullerton (CSU Fullerton), and University of California at Irvine (UC Irvine) in past election years.

Initial conversations have taken place to develop comprehensive marketing plans for colleges and universities and explore the possibility of hosting either a vote center or ballot drop box on campus. OCROV has already begun planning efforts with both CSU Fullerton and UC Irvine to host a vote center location on campus and explore similar opportunities with other local colleges and universities.

Business Partners

OCROV will partner with business associations and chambers of commerce to provide speaking engagements, voter registration training, and informational tabling at meetings. Past collaborative efforts include bringing the Pop-Up Mobile Voting Unit to the Ladera Ranch Chamber of Commerce’s Harvest Festival and communicating updates related to voting at events hosted by local chambers of commerce. Additionally, OCROV is in the process of planning a Roadshow to Vote Centers 2020 presentation geared towards the business community.

Speaking Engagements and Community Events

Speaking Engagements

The speaking engagement component of OCROV’s community outreach program is an integral part of outreaching to voters of many different backgrounds throughout Orange County. Covering a diverse and expansive area, the program aims to achieve the following goals:

  • Educate voters on the electoral process, including the transition to the vote center model
  • Provide information on special programs, online features and voter registration
  • Network and pursue collaborative opportunities

The focus is to provide small and large-scale communication to the community. Speaking engagements include attending various community meetings and events and conducting non-partisan, neutral, and culturally sensitive presentations.

As many groups exist within Orange County, speaking engagements allow OCROV to promote services, build partnerships, and interact with various communities. Targeted groups have included, but are not limited, to the following:

· Community groups

· Churches

· Citizenship classes

· Rotary clubs

· Universities

· Professional associations

· Parent Teacher Associations

· Student organizations

· Public service agencies

· Cultural clubs

· Non-profit organizations

· Youth groups

· Service organizations

· Senior citizen centers

Roadshow to Vote Centers 2020 Presentations

The Roadshow to Vote Centers 2020 is a traveling monthly presentation series where OCROV staff has been providing vote center planning updates. The Roadshow to Vote Centers 2020 began in May 2019 and a remaining schedule of upcoming events is listed on page 62 in Appendices.

Plans for the Roadshow to Vote Centers 2020 following the March 2020 Election have not been determined.

Speakers Bureau

In addition to speaking engagements supported by OCROV staff, the Speakers Bureau will be developed to train community leaders to present vote center information as trusted community messengers. OCROV previously operated a Speakers Bureau program during the 2004 rollout of new voting equipment, and the 2020 Speakers Bureau will be focused on opportunities for voters and the general public to learn about the transition to vote centers.

Community organizations will be invited to nominate members to participate in the Speakers Bureau. Individuals participating in the Speakers Bureau will receive training and presentation materials to effectively provide a general overview of the transition to vote centers.

Voting System Demonstrations

Following a detailed and transparent procurement process, a new voting system was approved by the Orange County Board of Supervisors in September 2019 and will replace the existing 15-year old voting system. The new voting system is certified by both the U.S. Election Assistance Commission and the Secretary of State and will offer new features to make voting easier and more accessible to voters.

To raise awareness and provide for public education, OCROV will host a minimum of 20 voting system demonstrations in advance of the March 2020 Election where the public will be able to view and interact with the new voting system. Efforts will be made to target large-scale events and collaborate with community partners to achieve high impact and exposure to many voters.

Community Events

To maintain OCROV’s presence in the community, OCROV will continue to focus its community outreach attendance to both small-to-medium and large-scale events. OCROV will be present at these events to provide information about the transition to the vote center model, voting, and other election information. Staff will engage the public, answer questions, and assist in filling out voter registration forms. By participating in these events, OCROV will have access to thousands of individuals in communities throughout Orange County. A list of potential community events being pursued in the 2020 election cycle is available on page 92 in Appendices.

Elected Officials and Government Agencies

OCROV will leverage existing working relationships with government agencies and elected officials to raise public awareness of the transition to vote centers.

Fall 2019 Collaborative Planning Meeting

In Fall 2019, OCROV will host a collaborative planning meeting in partnership with Secretary of State Alex Padilla. Invitees will include Orange County elected officials, government agencies, and staff to discuss vote centers and opportunities to inform constituents of the upcoming changes to voting and elections. This will mirror the successful Roadshow to Vote Centers 2020 presentation OCROV hosted with Orange County city clerks and government administrators in May 2019.

Potential collaborative opportunities include hosting a vote center or ballot drop box at a public agency location, making informational materials available at physical sites and online on websites, and relaying vote center and voting information to constituents.

This meeting is intended to strengthen the ongoing partnerships to relay information and support voters between OCROV, elected officials, and government agencies in 2020 and beyond.

Collaborative Community Outreach

Partnership with 2-1-1

OCROV will pursue an innovative partnership with 2-1-1 Orange County. 2-1-1 Orange County is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization offering a comprehensive information and referral system for Orange County residents to receive community health and human services and support.

Callers will hear a recording with vote center and election information as they wait to be connected. 2-1-1 Information and Referral Specialists will receive vote center information, be able to locate the nearest vote center or ballot drop box for a voter and refer voters to OCROV for additional assistance.

Partnership with the Orange County Transportation Agency

The Orange County Transportation Agency (OCTA) is the official provider of countywide public transportation in Orange County. In partnership with OCTA, OCROV intends to wrap public buses and bus stop benches with vote center marketing. By utilizing this strategy, the opportunity not only raises the awareness of vote centers among voters who utilize public transportation but also any individual in the vicinity of a public transportation vehicle or stop.

Vote Center Marketing Package for Government Agencies

A marketing package will be developed for government agencies to offer informational materials at a variety of public agency locations. Translated marketing materials will be available and provided to government agencies by request.

The package will include, but not be limited to:

  • Brochures
  • Flyers
  • Posters
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Map and List of Vote Center and Ballot Drop Box Locations

Community Engagement Suite

General Media Plan

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(i)(I)

To inform Orange County voters of the upcoming changes to voting and elections, OCROV will take an expansive approach to reach as many voters as possible, multiple times. By using a blend of social media, direct mail, print, broadcast, video, online, and radio approaches, our goal is to saturate the spectrum of media outlets for voters to increase the potential for a voter to see vote center informational and marketing materials.

Media Partners

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(i)(II), §4005(a)(10)(l)(i)(VIII)

OCROV will provide press releases, video content, and social media content for mass distribution and publication to existing media partners and seek out other trusted media sources to relay vote center communication. Accessibility options, methods to request an accessible ballot, vote center and ballot drop box locations, other general election information and other voting updates will be shared with media partners. For a list of media partners, please see page 57 in Appendices.

Additionally, Registrar of Voters Neal Kelley often appears on local and national media to speak as an elections expert and provide the perspective of an election official. These types of opportunities will be utilized to specifically support communicating changes on a macro level.

Language Media Partners
  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(i)(l)

Orange County’s diverse communities receive news updates and information from a variety of sources, including language media outlets. OCROV has dedicated full-time staff to serve as liaisons to language communities and have developed strong relationships with language media partners in communities that speak Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean, Farsi (Persian), and Tagalog. Information on the upcoming election and the toll-free voter assistance hotline will be shared with language media partners. For a list of language media partners, please see page 59 in Appendices.

Direct Voter Contacts

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(i)(X)

OCROV plans to send two to four direct mailers to advise all registered voters of the availability of OCROV’s toll-free voter assistance hotline and the upcoming changes to elections and voting. The mailers may vary in size but will be designed to catch the attention of the voter with vote center branding and messaging. The mailers may also provide information such as voting options, vote center and ballot drop box locations and hours, or when to expect a Voter Information Guide (VIG) or vote-by-mail (VBM) ballot.

Postage-Paid Postcard for Requesting Materials in an Alternate Language or an Accessible Format
  • 4005(a)(8)(B)(iii)

All registered voters will receive a postage-paid postcard in their VIG to request a VBM ballot in an accessible format and to request election materials in alternate languages per §14201 of the California Elections Code and §203 of the federal Voting Rights Act. Instructions will be included in the VIG and on the OCROV website for completing and returning the postcard.

Public Service Announcements

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(i)(VIII), §4005(a)(10)(l)(i)(IX)

OCROV is developing a suite of over 70 videos of varying lengths and themes (translated in all required languages). The videos will be informational as well as instructional such as notifying voters of the date of the election and different options for returning a ballot. Videos will promote a toll-free, accessible voter hotline to ask questions and receive voting and election-related information.

Filming will take place at various sites throughout Orange County, showcasing a sample vote center layout and external view of vote centers and ballot drop boxes.

The videos will be open-captioned and be in accessible formats to be inclusive of voters who are hard of hearing or deaf and voters who are blind or visually impaired. Additionally, videos will be audio-recorded in Spanish, Vietnamese, Chinese, Korean, Tagalog, and Farsi (Persian). Content will be provided to general media partners and language media partners. Please see page 57 in Appendices for a list of general media partners and page 59 for language media partners.

Social Media

The OCROV will use social media to attract new voters and to provide information to existing voters about the change to vote centers and updates on critical deadlines, events, voting tips, vote center and ballot drop box locations. 

OCROV is exploring opportunities with Facebook and YouTube to promote vote center information and target specific populations in Orange County such as younger voters between the ages of 18-25, members of the public who follow language media outlets, and individuals who are interested in accessibility advocacy.

Election Newsfeeds will be branded as “Election NewsClicks”, which will allow for blog posts to be positioned as timely and critical information. NewsClicks will be integrated with GovDelivery to automatically post blogs to Twitter and Facebook as well as produce an automated outbound e-mail to subscribers.

Below are social media strategies to achieve the overall goals of informing and educating voters about the transition to vote centers:

  • To expand OCROV’s presence on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and LinkedIn
  • To publish highly-targeted and site-specific content on a regular schedule
  • To engage meaningfully with active community members through social media
  • To stimulate and nurture genuine discussion on social media
  • To enhance the video content currently on OCROV’s YouTube channel to be functional to vote center outreach, education, and training

Website

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(i)(IV)

The OCROV website (ocvote.com/votecenter) will be utilized heavily as the main source of vote center information and materials for the public. Information on the OCROV website is in accessible formats and is publicly available. This will include the EAP, methods to request an accessible VBM ballot, the option to use an accessible voting device and how to use it, lists of vote centers and ballot drop boxes, and other information related to the VCA.

The website will also be translated into Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese, and Korean, so voters with limited-English proficiency in these languages will still be able to access vote center information.

Vote Center Newsletter

Starting in Spring 2019, OCROV launched a weekly vote center newsletter geared towards providing planning updates, outreach information, and opportunities to share public input. Past newsletters included survey data analysis, information about vote center workshops, and methods to provide vote center and ballot drop box site suggestions. There are approximately 5,500 subscribers to OCROV newsletters.

See page 106 in Appendices for a sample vote center newsletter.

Mobile Voting

OCROV will continue to seek opportunities to bring mobile voting to voters in unique locations and geographic areas where voters might otherwise have limited access to in-person voting options.

Community Engagement Mobile Outreach Vehicle

To conduct more effective and visible voter education, OCROV utilizes a custom-made Community Engagement Mobile Outreach Vehicle. The mobile outreach vehicle is fully accessible and equipped with interactive voting displays on board. It gives all the opportunity to experience the democratic process including on-the-go voting.

Since 2004, our mobile fleet has been showcased at numerous community events, parades and outdoor venues. Moreover, these vehicles have been officially and effectively utilized as a fully contained voting location and are available throughout the voting period as a backup vote center. The units were a first of their kind and have been replicated in areas across the country.

Pop-Up Mobile Voting Unit

OCROV continues to develop innovative solutions in response to voter trends and inspiration was taken from pop-up stores and restaurants that often draw positive public attention in areas with high traffic. Ultimately, the goal is to garner the interest of the public at events by using proven strategies, such as simple design principles and targeted signage that can be changed depending on the event.

The mobile unit has a custom wrap to match the marketing and branding plan OCROV has undertaken across the entire agency. The mobility of this platform promotes voter engagement and participation and allows OCROV to reach underrepresented populations and high-density locations to provide voting opportunities, vote center information, and improve the voter experience.

The Pop-Up Mobile Voting Unit will be utilized in the 2020 election cycle. Locations will be balanced between opportunities to reach geographically isolated voters and high-impact events to reach many voters. Voters will be notified in the VIG and VBM instructions of any mobile voting opportunities. Details such as locations and dates and hours of operations will be published in the VIG and website at ocvote.com/early.

See page 105 for images of OCROV’s mobile fleet.

Projected Budget for Voter Outreach

  • 4005(a)(10)(l)(i)(VII), §4005(a)(10)(l)(i)(VII)

The transition to vote centers is a fundamental change for Orange County voters and will require significant funding for the multiple facets of the Voter Education and Outreach Plan through the 2020 election cycle.

Voter Education and Outreach Funding and Comparison to Past Budgets

Activity

Jun 2018

Polling Place

Actual Costs

Nov 2018

Polling Place

Actual Costs

2020

Vote Center

Budget

Advertising

$38,634

$111,041

$1,500,000

Newspaper Legal Ads

$50,000

Misc. Advertising

$84,945

Outreach

$124,342

$16,182

$500,000

Misc. Outreach Operations

$45,000

Voter Outreach events

$10,000

 Secretary of State Outreach Grant/Contract Funding Source (expected to be applied toward existing advertising expenses)

$1,875,000

Appendices

Public Meetings

Vote Center Workshops

In development of the EAP, OCROV hosted 28 vote center workshops throughout Orange County to gather input from the public. Over 600 members of the public attended these workshops and engaged in the opportunity to learn about the upcoming transition to vote centers and provide feedback.

To be inclusive of targeted communities, language assistance was provided at select workshops and particular workshops were promoted to the disability community.

Targeted Community

Number of Workshops

Disability Community

2

Seniors

2

Spanish

5

Vietnamese

2

Korean

2

Chinese

1

Tagalog

1

Farsi (Persian)

1

A full schedule of the vote center workshops is provided in the comprehensive vote center workshop flyer below.

Vote Center Workshop Calendar

Speaking Engagements and Community Events

Speaking Engagements and Community Events 2/2019 - Present

Date

2019 Event Name

City

Host Organization

3/2/19

2019 Orange County Lantern Festival

Costa Mesa

Orange County's Pacific Symphony and South Coast Chinese Cultural Center

3/19/19

Citizenship Ceremonies - March 2019 (1)

Anaheim

USCIS

3/21/19

Citizenship Ceremonies - March 2019 (2)

Anaheim

USCIS

3/23/19

First Annual - Aging Together - Health and Resource Fair AASCSC

Santa Ana

Orange County Asian and Pacific Islander Community Alliance (OCAPICA), and Asian American Senior Citizens Service Center (AASCSC)

3/24/19

6th Annual Persian New Year Festival

Irvine

Iranian-American Community Group of Orange County (IAC Group)

3/30/19

Laguna Niguel High School Job & College Fair

Laguna Niguel

Laguna Niguel High School

3/31/19

Persian New Year Picnic Day

Irvine

Network of Iranian-American Professionals of Orange County (NIPOC)

4/3/19

Los Amigos of OC Meeting

Anaheim

Los Amigos of OC

4/11/19

2019 FoCE Conference

Sacramento

Future of California Elections (FoCE)

4/13/19

VIAN High School Involvement Meeting

Irvine

VIAN, WeIrvine

4/13/19

City of Westminster 2019 Spring Festival

Westminster

Westminster City

4/16/19

Katella High School Voter Education Weeks

Anaheim

Katella High School

4/19/19

Pacifica High School Civics Class Presentations

Garden Grove

Pacifica High School

4/20/19

Korean American Grassroots Conference Regional Seminar

Irvine

Korean American Grassroots Conference

4/22/19

Earth Day Event at Golden West College

Huntington Beach

Golden West College

4/23/19

Achieve Better Communication (ABC) Meeting

Tustin

Achieve Better Communication

4/26/19

Northwood High School Voter Education Weeks

Irvine

Northwood High School

4/29/19

Beckman High School Meet the Professionals Fair

Irvine

Beckman High School

4/30/19

Irvine Republican Women Federated Meeting

Irvine

Irvine Republican Women Federated

5/4/19

SOKA International Festival

Aliso Viejo

SOKA University

5/4/19

Cinco de Mayo Fiesta Anaheim

Anaheim

Fiesta United, Inc.

5/10/19

14th Annual AAPI Heritage Month Celebration

Bellflower

Southern CA Edison

5/11/19

State of the Community

Fullerton

Fullerton Collaborative

5/18/19

"72nd California LULAC Annual State Convention" -Building Bridges for Unity

Garden Grove

LULAC

5/19/19

Vesak Festival - Buddha's Birthday Celebration

Garden Grove

Giac Ly Buddhist Monastery

5/23/19

Korean American Chamber of Commerce of Orange County Introduction

Garden Grove

Korean American Chamber of Commerce of Orange County

5/28/19

Orange County Asian Chamber Leadership Mixer

Costa Mesa

Asian Business Association of Orange County (ABAOC)

5/31/19

Voice of Change

Anaheim

OC Health Care Agency (OCHCA) and Orange County Asian and Pacific Islander Community Alliance (OCAPICA)

6/1/19

VIAN School Year-End Meeting

Irvine

VIAN

6/2/19

2019-06-02 Together We Will OC Voter Registration Training

Irvine

Together We Will OC

6/4/19

KUCI OC Spotlight Talk Radio Show

KUCI

6/7/19

Annual Orange County Hiring Fair

Costa Mesa

Michelle Steel, Supervisor, 2nd District Orange County Board Of Supervisors And KACC Foundation

6/11/19

Peace & Justice Ministry Voter Registration Presentation

Santa Ana

Volunteers of the Peace & Justice Ministry at the Christ our Savior Parish.

6/12/19

AASCSC's 30th Anniversary and Dragon Boat Festival Celebration

Santa Ana

Asian American Senior Citizens Service Center (AASCSC)

6/12/19

Annual Filipino-American Lawyers of Orange County Membership Meeting and FACCOC Mixer

Newport Coast

Filipino-American Lawyers of Orange County (FLOC)

6/30/19

Tabling Sunday Mass Christ Our Savior Parish

Santa Ana

Christ Our Savior Parish

7/1/19

ITZ Happenin! Radio Show Interview

ITZ Happenin!

7/10/19

Los Amigos Community Forum

Anaheim

7/12/19

Laguna Woods Republican Club ROV Tour

Santa Ana

ROV

7/18/19

National Disability Voter Registration Week

Anaheim

7/25/19

Korean American Chamber of Commerce's Breakfast with Police Chiefs

Garden Grove

Korean American Chamber of Commerce-Orange County

7/25/19

Asian Americans In Action Community Mixer

Santa Ana

Asian Americans In Action

7/25/19

Orange County Labor Federation Candidate Academy

Buena Park

OCLF

7/31/19

OC Fair

Costa Mesa

8/3/19

City of La Palma Civic Expo & National Night Out

La Palma

City of La Palma

8/3/19

OC Fair

Costa Mesa

8/3/19

Anaheim Democrats Club

Anaheim

Anaheim Democrats Club

8/7/19

OC Fair

Costa Mesa

City Officials and Government Agencies

OCROV leveraged existing working relationships with government agencies and elected officials to raise public awareness of the transition to vote centers by sharing marketing materials and the calendar of vote center workshops. Numerous events and speaking engagements with government agencies have been scheduled to expand the initial 28 scheduled vote center workshops. City officials and government staff have been OCROV’s first partners in vote center outreach and education.

Multimedia materials made available to government agencies for distribution and constituent outreach include:

  • Graphics (various formats depending on request)
  • Press releases
  • Newsletters
  • Webpage links

Community Partners

 If you or your organization would like to partner with OCROV on vote center outreach and education, please visit the website ocvote.com/votecenter or email ocvoter@rov.ocgov.com.

Language Community Partners

· Achieve Better Communication

· Alliance for Justice

· Alliance Rehabilitation

· Anaheim Spanish Adventist Church

· Asian American Senior Citizens Service Center

· Asian Americans Advancing Justice - Los Angeles

· Asian Americans Advancing Justice - Orange County

· Association of the Vietnamese Language & Culture Schools of Southern California

· Council on American-Islamic Relations - California

· Cambodian Family

· Catholic Charities of Orange County

· Center for Asians United for Self Empowerment

· Centro Cultural de Mexico

· Chinese American Association of Orange County

· Chinese American Mutual Association

· CIELO

· Comunidad Forum

· CSUF Asian Pacific American Resource Center

· De Colores OC

· El Modena

· Family Enrichment

· Filipino American Chamber of Commerce

· Fundacion de Sobrevivientes de Trafico

· Hispanic Bar Association of Orange County

· Hispanic Women Network

· Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Orange County

· Institute of Vietnamese Studies

· inter-Community Action Network

· Iranian Circle of Women's Intercultural Network

Language Community Partners (continued)

· Irvine Evergreen Chinese Senior Association

· Korean American Center

· Korean Community Services

· Korean Resource Center

· Latino Health Access

· Los Amigos of Orange County

· LULAC Anaheim

· LULAC Santa Ana

· LULAC Fullerton College

· LULAC Santa Ana

· Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund

· National Association of Latino Elected Officials

· Network of Iranian-American Professionals of Orange County

· National Hispanic Business Association

· North Orange County Chinese Culture Association

· Orange County Asian Pacific Islander Community Alliance

· Orange County Chinese American Chamber of Commerce

· Orange County Herald Center

· Orange County Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

· Orange County Youth Immigrant United

· Overseas Community Care Network of Orange County

· Parent Union Santa Ana

· South Asian Network

· South Coast Chinese Cultural Association/Irvine Chinese School

· Southern California Council of Chinese Schools

· Taller San Jose

· Union of Vietnamese Student Association

· Vietnamese American Chamber of Commerce

· VietRISE

· Voting Involvement Association Nonprofit

· WeIrvine

Sample Language Assistance Card
Language Assistance Card

Disability Community Partners

· Age Well Senior Services

· Braille Institute

· California Council for the Blind

· City of Irvine - Disabilities Services

· Council on Aging

· Dayle McIntosh Center

· Department of Rehabilitation

· Disability Rights California

· Disability Student Services - Cal State University Fullerton

· Disability Student Services - Fullerton College

· Disability Student Services - Santiago Canyon College

· Down Syndrome Association of Orange County

· Easter Seals

· North Orange County Senior Collaborative

· OC Deaf Equal Access Foundations

· OC In-Home Supportive Services Public Authority

· Orange County Transportation Authority

· Project Independence

· Regional Center of Orange County

· Santa Ana Public Library TeenSpace

· Sensory Impaired Guidance Network

· University of California Irvine Disability Services Center

· Vocational Visions

Political, Advocacy, and Professional Organizations

· American Civil Liberties Union

· Democratic Party of Orange County

· Future of California Elections

· Green Party of Orange County

· League of Women Voters of Orange County

· National American Association of Colored People

· Orange County Communities Organized for Responsible Development 

· Orange County Congregation Community Organization

· Orange County Employee Association

· Orange County Labor Federation

· Orange County Professional Firefighters Association

· Republican Party of Orange County

· Republican Women Federated of Orange County

· Retired Employees of Orange County

· Resilience OC

Media Partners

If you or your organization would like to partner with OCROV on vote center outreach and education, please visit the website ocvote.com/votecenter or email ocvoter@rov.ocgov.com.

Publication Name

Type

Aliso Viejo News

Newspaper

Anaheim Bulletin

Newspaper

Associated Press (AP) Orange County California

Newspaper

Capistrano Dispatch

Newspaper

Capistrano Valley News

Newspaper

Chapman University Panther

College/University Newspaper

Coast Magazine

Magazine

Costa Mesa Daily Pilot

Newspaper

CSUF Daily Titan

College/University Newspaper

Cypress College Chronicle

College/University Newspaper

Dana Point Times

Newspaper

Fullerton College Hornet

College/University Newspaper

Huntington Beach News

Newspaper

Irvine World News

Newspaper

KABC TV 7 (ABC)

Television

KCAL TV 9

Television

KCBS TV 2 (CBS)

Television

KCOP TV 13 (MyTV)

Television

KDOC TV 56

Television

KFI AM 640

Radio

KLCS TV 58 (PBS)

Television

KNBC TV 4 (NBC)

Television

KNX AM 1070

Radio

KOCE TV 50 (PBS)

Television

KTLA TV 5 (CW)

Television

KTTV TV 11 (Fox)

Television

KUCI FM 89.3

Radio

Laguna Beach Independent

Newspaper

Laguna News-Post

Newspaper

Laguna Woods Globe

Newspaper

Los Angeles Times

Newspaper

Publication Name

Type

New University

College/University Newspaper

OC Weekly

Magazine

OCC Coast Report

College/University Newspaper

Orange City News

Newspaper

Orange Coast Magazine

Magazine

Orange County Business Journal

Newspaper

Orange County Register

Newspaper

Orange County Reporter

Newspaper

Saddleback Valley News

Newspaper

San Clemente Times

Newspaper

Seal Beach Sun

Newspaper

Tustin News

Newspaper

UCI New University

College/University Newspaper

Voice of OC

Newspaper

Western Outdoors News

Newspaper

Westminster Journal

Newspaper

Westways Magazine

Newspaper

Yorba Linda Star

Newspaper

Language Media Partners

Language

Publication Name

Farsi (Persian)

Orange County Persian Community TV

Farsi (Persian)

Dakeeh Magazine

Farsi (Persian)

Seeb Magazine

Farsi (Persian)

PAYAM ASHENA

Farsi (Persian)

KIRN - Radio Iran 670 AM

Farsi (Persian)

Iranian Hotline

Tagalog

Radio Filipino USA

Tagalog

California Journal for Filipino Americans

Tagalog

Asian Journal - Southern California

Vietnamese

VNA TV

Vietnamese

KVLA 57.3 TV

Vietnamese

Little Saigon Radio

Vietnamese

Nguoi Viet Daily News

Vietnamese

Vien Dong

Vietnamese

Viet Bao

Vietnamese

Pho Bolsa TV

Vietnamese

Little Saigon TV

Chinese

World Journal

Chinese

Sing Tao Daily

Chinese

Taiwan Daily

Chinese

Chinese L.A. Daily News

Chinese

US News Express

Chinese

ChineseNewsUSA.Com

Chinese

Five Continents & Four Oceans News

Chinese

International Daily News

Chinese

The Central News

Chinese

Pacific Times

Chinese

America Commercial News

Chinese

Apple Daily News

Chinese

The China Press

Chinese

Epoch Times

Chinese

Eastern Television (ETTV) America

Chinese

New Tang Dynasty Television (NTDTV)

Chinese

CTI Television/Zhong Want TV (CITTV/ZWTV)

Language

Publication Name

Chinese

Sky Link TV

Chinese

SINO TV

Chinese

Phoenix Satellite TV

Chinese

U.S. National TV

Chinese

WCETV

Korean

The Korea Daily

Korean

Korea Times

Korean

Korea Town Daily

Korean

The Weekly Herald

Korean

Town News

Korean

SBS International

Korean

MBC America

Korean

KBS America

Korean

Radio Korea-AM 1540

Korean

Radio Seoul-AM 1650

Korean

Woori Radio - AM 1230

Korean

Korean Gospel Broadcasting-AM1190

Korean

TVK24

Korean

Dongpo News

Korean

YTN

Korean

Christian Vision

Korean

Kukmin Daily

Korean

Dongpo Journal

Korean

Sunday Journal

Korean

CGN TV

Korean

Christian Herald

Korean

Uri Radio

Korean

Media Group

Spanish

Santa Ana Noticias

Spanish

Azteca

Spanish

Rumores Newspaper

Spanish

Para Todos

Spanish

El Aviso

Spanish

Excelsior

Spanish

HOY

Language

Publication Name

Spanish

La Opinion

Spanish

KMEX-TV (Univision)

Spanish

KVEA-TV (Telemundo)

Spanish

KVEA-TV (Telemundo)

Spanish

KWHY-TV

Roadshow to Vote Centers 2020 Presentations

The Roadshow to Vote Centers 2020 is a traveling monthly meeting where staff will provide vote center planning updates.

Date and Time

Organization

Location

May 17, 2019
12pm

Government Administrators

Irvine Civic Center
1 Civic Center Plaza, Irvine, CA 92606

June 2, 2019
4:30pm

Together We Will OC

IRWD Duck Club
15 Riparian Way, Irvine, CA 92612

July 15, 2019
10:15am

League of Women Voters of Orange County

Sisters of St. Joseph
480 S. Batavia Street, Orange, CA 92868

August 22, 2019
6pm

Republican Women Federated of
Orange County

Registrar of Voters Office
1300 S. Grand Avenue, Santa Ana, CA 92705

September 23, 2019
6:30pm

Democratic Party of
Orange County

DPOC Headquarters
1916 W. Chapman Avenue, Orange, CA 92868

October 21, 2019
7pm

Orange County
Republican Party

Hilton Costa Mesa
3050 Bristol Street, Costa Mesa, CA 92626

November 2019

UC Irvine

TBD

December 2019

CSU Fullerton

TBD

January 2020

TBD

TBD

February 2020

Business

TBD

Public Input Overview

Community Elections Working Group

The Community Election Working Group (CEW) is a diverse 25-member community advisory board committed to making sure elections are open and accessible.

CEW Members

Name

Organization

CEW Chair, Steven W. Spillman

Member, Mission Viejo Investment Advisory Commission

CEW Vice-Chair, Lucinda Williams

City Clerk, City of Fullerton

CITY CLERKS

Adria M. Jimenez

City Clerk, City of Buena Park

Theresa Bass

City Clerk, City of Anaheim

Molly McLaughlin

City Clerk, City of Irvine

Lucinda Williams
(CEW Vice-Chair)

City Clerk, City of Fullerton

ASIAN COMMUNITY

Tammy Kim
(CEW LAAC Co-Chair)

Managing Director, Korean American Center / Korean Community Services

Henry Noh Edmunds

Attorney

Tim Cheng

Co-President, Asian American Senior Citizens Service Center

Charles Kim

President, inter-Community Action Network (iCAN)

LATINO COMMUNITY

Alba Ramiro

Parish Ministry Coordinator, Catholic Charities of Orange County

Ruben Alvarez, Jr.

Publisher, Stay Connected OC

Eddie Marquez, J.D.

Executive Board Member, OC Hispanic Chamber

Marisol Ramirez

Community Engagement Lead, Regal Medical Group

DISABLED COMMUNITY

Elizabeth Campbell
(CEW VAAC Co-Chair)

Systems Change Advocate, Dayle McIntosh Center

Debra Marsteller

Executive Director, Project Independence 

Paul Spencer

Attorney, Disability Rights California

Gabriel Taylor

Voting Rights Advocate

SENIOR COMMUNITY

Judith Barnes

Member of the Public

POLL WORKERS

Anna Jimenez Plank

Member of the Public

Suzanne Narducy

DEMOCRATIC PARTY

Ada Briceño

Chair, Democratic Party of Orange County

REPUBLICAN PARTY

Randall Avila

Executive Director, Republican Party of Orange County

ALTERNATIVE PARTIES

Vacant

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS

Wanda Shaffer

Representative, League of Women Voters of OC

YOUTH REPRESENTATIVE

Alexander Williams

Member of the Public

VETERANS AFFAIRS

Lyle Brakob

Member of the Public

AT LARGE

Garrett M. Fahy

Election Law Attorney

Steven W. Spillman (CEW Chair)

Member, Mission Viejo Investment Advisory Commission

Meeting Agenda

Meeting Agenda Page 1 Meeting Agenda Page 2

Voting Accessibility Committee & Language Accessibility Committee

Implemented in early 2017, the CEW Subcommittee Voting Accessibility Advisory Committee (VAAC) and the CEW Subcommittee Language Accessibility Advisory Committee (LAAC) are two independent committees of the Community Election Working group that meet to consider the needs of voters with disabilities and language minority communities pertaining to vote centers and all mail-ballot elections.

VAAC and LAAC were established to advise on the transition to vote centers, in particular for voters with disabilities, voters with language needs and organizations that serve them. Agendas focus on voter education and outreach, create collaborative opportunities and provide a forum for community informed feedback and input on operational best practices.

If you or your organization would like more information about these community advisory groups or are interested in becoming a member, please visit ocvote.com/cew or email ocvoter@rov.ocgov.com.

Voting Accessibility Advisory Committee

The CEW - Voting Accessibility Committee, an independent committee of the Community Election Working group, meets to consider the needs of voters with disabilities pertaining to vote centers and all mail-ballot elections. This committee meets the statutory requirements of the Voting Accessibility Advisory Committee.

Name

Organization

Andrea Pitsenbarger

California Council for the Blind

Dan Quinn

Easter Seals

Debra Marstellar

Project Independence

Edward Roth

Disability Student Services - Fullerton College

Elizabeth Campbell

Dayle McIntosh Center

Gabriel Taylor

Disability Rights California

Jamie Cansler

Council on Aging

Larry Singer

Advocate

Lucy Carr-Rollitt

Disability Student Services - Santiago Canyon College

Melanie Masud

Orange County Transportation Agency

Paul Spencer

Disability Rights California

Phillip Reeves

Braille Institute Anaheim Center

Reina Hernandez

Regional Center of Orange County

Starr Avedesian

Disability Student Services - Santiago Canyon College

Meeting agenda
Voting Accessibility Committee Meeting Agenda
Language Accessibility Advisory Committee

The CEW - Voting Language Committee, an independent committee of the Community Election Working group, meets to consider the needs of language minority communities pertaining to vote centers and all mail-ballot elections. This committee meets the statutory requirements of the Languages Accessibility Advisory Committee.

Name

Organization

Alba Ramiro

Catholic Charities of Orange County

Charles Kim

inter-Community Action Network

Faye Hezar

Iranian Circle of Women's Intercultural Network

Jini Shim

Korean American Center

Jonathan Paik

Korean Resource Center

June Shang

Achieve Better Communication

Kerry Lieu

Irvine Evergreen Chinese Senior Association

Kiyana Asemanfar

California Common Cause

Kwang Ho Kim

Korean Community Services

Mike Chen

South Coast Chinese Culture Association

Natalie A. Tran

Department of Secondary Education at CSU Fullerton

Shikha Bhatnagar

South Asian Network

Sudi Farokhnia

Iranian Circle of Women's Intercultural Network

Tammy Kim

Korean American Center

Teresa Mercado-Cota

Santa Ana College

ThuyVy Luyen

Association of the Vietnamese Language & Culture Schools of Southern California

Tim Cheng

Asian American Senior Citizens Service Center

Tracy La

VietRISE

Vattana Peong

Cambodian Family

Zeke Hernandez

Santa Ana LULAC #147

Meeting agenda
Language Accessibility Committee Meeting Agenda

Survey

OCROV historically utilizes survey data to enhance its services, resources, and planning for future elections. In preparation for the transition to a new model of voting, the Vote Center Feedback Survey has been developed to gather public input on vote center services and locations. The public is asked about language assistance needs and preferred services, ideal travel distance to a vote center, and ranking of site selection considerations. 

Respondents are able to complete the survey on paper at voter outreach events or online after learning about the upcoming changes through the vote center website. The two versions of the survey—paper and online—are identical, with the only difference being that the online version is open to the public 24/7. At the time of writing the draft EAP, OCROV has received over 1,200 surveys from the public.

The Vote Center Feedback survey was also translated into Spanish, Vietnamese, Korean, Chinese, Farsi (Persian), and Tagalog.

Paper Survey

Paper surveys are collected from a variety of outreach events such as community workshops, Roadshow to Vote Centers 2020 monthly presentations, and other outreach events. After learning about the upcoming changes at outreach events, attendees have an option to take a survey home and mail it in later with the provided postage-paid return envelope.

Event Type

Paper Surveys

Roadshow to Vote Centers 2020

37

EAP Community Workshops

509

Community Outreach Events

92

Mailed Surveys

6

English Vote Center Feedback Survey
Chinese Vote Center Feedback Survey
English Vote Center Feedback Survey> Epanishnglish Vote Center Feedback Su<br>rvey Vietnamese Vote Center Feedback Survey
Farsi (Persian) Vote Center Feedback Survey
Tagalog Vote Center Feedback Survey

Online Survey

The online survey is available to the public to complete at any time or place that is convenient for them. OCROV leveraged its existing partnerships with local colleges and universities, community partners, and media with access to the online survey.

The online survey will be available to the public until vote center and ballot drop boxes locations are finalized.

Additional Efforts to Solicit Input from Language Voters

OCROV took a targeted approach to outreach to voters who have requested election materials in one of the languages supported by OCROV. Approximately 18,000 translated survey invitations have been emailed to voters who requested language assistance.

Online Vote Center Survey Screenshot

Vote Center Layout

Vote Center Layout

List of Vote Centers and Ballot Drop Box Locations

The vote center and ballot drop box selection process is currently ongoing. The tables below will be updated as locations are confirmed for participation. This information will also be provided on the website and in the VIG.

11 Day Vote Centers

Facility

Address

Days/Hours

Orange County
Registrar of Voters

1300 S Grand Avenue

Building C

Santa Ana, CA 92705

4 Day Vote Centers

Facility

Address

Days/Hours

Ballot Drop Box Locations

Facility

Address

Days/Hours

Orange County
Registrar of Voters

1300 S Grand Avenue

Building C

Santa Ana, CA 92705


If you would like to make suggestion for a potential site, please complete the Site Selection Suggestion Form at ocvote.com/sitesuggestion. This form will be available to the public until vote center and ballot drop box locations are finalized.

Voter’s Choice Act Criteria Maps

Public Transit Routes

Public Transit Route Map

Areas with Low Vote-by-Mail Usage

Low Vote-By-Mail Usage Map

Population Density

Population Density Map

Language Communities

Public Traommunitiesnsit Route Map

Voters with Disabilities

Voters with Disabilities Map

Low Household Vehicle Ownership

Vehicle Ownership Map

Areas with Low-Income Communities

Low-Income Communities Map

Areas with Eligible Residents Who are Not Yet Registered to Vote

Eligible Residents Not Yet Registered to Vote Map

Areas Not Suitable for Vote Center or Ballot Drop Box Locations

Areas Unsuitable for Vote Center or Ballot Dropbox Location Map

Community Event Calendar List

The list below represents potential and targeted community events OCROV plans to pursue in 2019 and 2020. Events will continually be added, and suggestions can be shared via email to ocvoter@rov.ocgov.com.

Potential Community Events Calendar 2019 - 2020

Month

Event Name

Organizer

January

Asian Garden Mall Flower Festival

Asian Garden Mall

January

Citizenship Ceremonies

United States District Court, Central District of California

February

ICS Chinese New Year Celebration

Irvine Chinese School (ICS) and South Coast Chinese Cultural Association (SCCCA)

February

Irvine Evergreen Chinese Senior Association New Year Celebration

Irvine Evergreen Chinese Senior Association

February

Irvine High School Multi-Culture Festival

Irvine High School Parent, Teacher, and Student Association

February

Candidate Academy

Orange County Labor Federation

February

UVSA Tet Festival

Union of Vietnamese Student Association

March

Braille Institute of America Voter Outreach and Education Presentation

Braille Institute of America

March

Celebrate Life of Cesar Chavez

St. Boniface Church

March

Celebrating Korean American Leadership

UCI Korean American Alumni Chapter

March

KinderCaminata

Cypress College

March

KinderCaminata

Fullerton College

March

KinderCaminata

Santa Ana College

March

Laguna Niguel High School Job & College Fair

Laguna Niguel High School

March

Lunar New Year Celebration

Asian American Senior Citizens Service Center

March

Orange County Lantern Festival

Pacific Symphony and South Coast Chinese Cultural Center

March

Persian New Year Festival

Iranian-American Community Group of Orange County

March

Persian New Year Picnic Day

Network of Iranian-American Professionals of Orange County

March

San Juan Hills High School Voter Registration Training

San Juan Hills High School

March

ShamROCK n' RUN

St. Jude Medical Center

March

Westminster Spring Festival

City of Westminster

April

Arts Alive Festival

City of Mission Viejo

April

Beckman High School Meet the Professionals Fair

Beckman High School

April

City of Westminster Spring Festival

City of Westminster

April

Cypress Farmers Market

City of Cypress

April

Dia del Niño

City of Santa Ana

April

Dia del Niño

El Centro Cultural De Mexico

April

DTSA Art Walk

Downtown Santa Ana

April

Earth Day Event

Golden West College

April

Feria de Abril

Feria Los Alamitos

April

Friendly Centers Resource Networking Event

The Friendly Center

April

Irvine Valley College Spring Job Fair

Irvine Valley College

April

Katella High School Voter Education Week Event

Katella High School

April

Voter Registration Training

League of Women Voters of Orange County

April

Love Buena Park

City of Buena Park

April

Media Arts Santa Ana (MASA) Mixer

MASA/OC Film Fiesta

April

Persian New Year Festival

Network of Iranian-American Professionals of Orange County

April

Dia del Niño

OC Fairgrounds

April

Renters Protection Forum

Orange County Communities Organized for Responsible Development

April

Summer Youth Job Fair

Employment Development Department

April

OC LGBTQ Youth Convening

LGBT Center

May

5 de Mayo Festival Anaheim

City of Anaheim

May

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month Forum

Asian Americans Advancing Justice – Orange County

May

Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month Celebration

 Southern California Edison

May

Battle of the Mariachis

Mission San Juan Capistrano

May

CIELO Showcase

CIELO

May

Cinco de Mayo Festival

City of San Clemente

May

Cinco De Mayo In Tustin

City of Tustin

May

Student Tabling Event

CSU Fullerton

May

Student Tabling Event

Cypress College

May

Dancing Out Stigma

Bowers Museum

May

Downtown Anaheim Farmers Market

City of Anaheim

May

Estrella Awards

Orange County Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

May

FaCT Conference

Families and Communities Together

May

Heartbeat of Mexico

Chapman University

May

Irvine Evergreen Chinese Senior Association Monthly Meeting

Irvine Evergreen Chinese Senior Association

May

Irvine Korean Cultural Festival

Irvine Korean Cultural Festival

May

Jarana Carnavalera

Jarana Carnavalera en California

May

Mariachi Festival

Viva la Vida/Calacas

May

New Horizons Dinner-Cinco de Mayo

YMCA of OC

May

OC Greek Festival

St. John the Baptist Greek Orthodox Church

May

OC Human Relations Awards Dinner

OC Human Relations

May

Open Garden Day

City of Santa Ana

May

Orange County Asian Chamber Leadership Mixer

Asian Business Association of Orange County

May

Rancho Days Fiesta-Heritage Hill Historical Park

OC Parks

May

Saddleback College Tabling Event

Saddleback College

May

Santa Ana College Tabling Event

Santa Ana College

May

SOKA International Festival

SOKA University

May

State of the Community

Fullerton Collaborative

May

Cinco de Mayo Fiesta

The Outlets at San Clemente

May

UCI Anti-Cancer Challenge Run

UC Irvine

May

Vesak Festival - Buddha's Birthday Celebration

Giac Ly Buddhist Monastery

May

Vesak Festival - Mile Square Park

Vietnamese American Buddhist Congregation

May

Veterans Luncheon

LULAC

May

Veterans Resource Center Santa Ana College

Santa Ana College

May

Voice of Change

OC Health Care Agency (OCHCA) and Orange County Asian and Pacific Islander Community Alliance (OCAPICA)

May

Willcock Community Meeting

Orange County Communities Organized for Responsible Development

June

Annual Filipino-American Lawyers of Orange County Membership Meeting and Mixer

Filipino-American Lawyers of Orange County

June

Annual Orange County Hiring Fair

Michelle Steel, Supervisor, 2nd District Orange County Board of Supervisors and KACC Foundation

June

APIA Vote Leadership Institute

Orange County Asian Pacific Islander Community Alliance

June

Candidate Academy

Orange County Labor Federation

June

Celebracion y Mercadito

Radio Santa Ana/Centro Cultural Santa Ana

June

Citizenship Ceremonies

United States District Court, Central District of California

June

Citizenship Fair

Orange County Communities Organized for Responsible Development

June

Feria de Salud

Las Lomas Gardens Apartments

June

Fiesta Appreciation Day - Caregiving Day

Crooru Caregivers on-demand

June

OCCORD Leadership Academy

Orange County Communities Organized for Responsible Development

June

Open House

Rancho Santiago Community College District

June

San Juan Capistrano Summer Concert Series

City of San Juan Capistrano

June

Small Business Week Awards

Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Orange County

June

Tabling Sunday Mass Christ Our Savior Parish

Christ Our Savior Parish Church

July

American Indian Families

Walking Shield

July

Candidate Academy

Orange County Labor Federation

July

Summer Jazz Concert Series

Segerstrom Center for the Arts

July

Cypress Community Festival

Cypress Community Festival Association

August

American Mariachi

South Coast Repertory

August

Brea Fest

City of Brea

August

Canto de Anaheim

Pacific Symphony

August

Chicanxs Unidxs Annual Fundraiser

Chicanxs Unidxs

August

Annual Civic Expo & National Night Out

City of La Palma

August

Concerts in the Park

City of Orange

August

CSU Fullerton Move-In Day

CSU Fullerton

August

Downtown Fullerton Farmers Market

City of Fullerton

August

Fiesta Music Festival

San Clemente Chamber of Commerce

August

Movies in the Park Series

City of Fountain Valley

August

Sizzlin’ Summer Concert Series

City of Irvine

August

National Night Out

Mission Viejo Police Department

August

OC Night Market

Costa Mesa

August

Orange County Fair

Costa Mesa

August

Placentia Certified Farmers Market

City of Placentia

August

Sabor a Mar -Folcklorico/Mariachi

Relampago del Cielo

August

Evening in the Park Summer Concerts

City of San Juan Capistrano

August

Seal Beach Farmers Market

City of Seal Beach

August

Senior Fitness Expo

City of Irvine

August

The Vic

Victoria Skimboards

August

Musicals and Plays Series

Santa Ana College

September

9/11 Commemoration

The Richard Nixon Presidential Library & Museum

September

AASCSC Moon Festival

Asian American Senior Citizens Service Center

September

Anaheim Mariachi Festival

Rhythmo Inc. Mariachi Academy

September

Discoverfest

CSU Fullerton

September

City of Brea Wellness Festival

City of Brea

September

Fiestas Patrias

City of Santa Ana

September

National Voter Registration Day Press Conference

City of Santa Ana

September

County of Orange Career Expo and Open House

County of Orange

September

Irvine Global Village Festival

City of Irvine

September

Irvine Moon Festival

Irvine Chinese School/South Coast Chinese Cultural Center

September

Lake Forest Heroes Day

City of Lake Forest

September

Mid-Autumn Children's Festival

The Coordinating Committee of Vietnamese American Youth Organizations

September

OCEA Health Fair

Orange County Employees Association

September

Orange International Street Fair

City of Orange

September

SAC Club Rush

Santa Ana College

September

Santa Ana Family Day

MAGIC Inc. Academy of the Arts

September

Westminster Dia de la Familia

City of Westminster

October

Anaheim Fall Festival & Halloween Parade

City of Anaheim

October

Citizenship Ceremonies

United States District Court, Central District of California

October

Halloween Family Fun

City of Stanton

October

Senior Wellness Expo

City of Yorba Linda

October

Community Resource Fair

Huntington Beach Adult School

October

CSU Fullerton Faculty Voter Registration Drive

CSU Fullerton

October

Donate a Day of Service Event

Cypress College

October

Downtown Fullerton Art Walk

Magoski Arts Colony

October

Fullerton Museum Center Event

City of Fullerton

October

Huntington Beach Airshow

The Great Pacific Airshow

October

Hispanic Heritage Month Mixer

Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Orange County

October

Irvine Evergreen Chinese Senior Association Monthly Meeting

Irvine Evergreen Chinese Senior Association Monthly Meeting

October

Irvine Valley College Pinoy Piyesta

Elevate AAPI @ Irvine Valley College

October

Employee Registration Event

Masimo

October

Nashtai & Ashnai: Persian Breakfast with the UC Irvine Iranian Student Union

Iranian Student Union at UC Irvine

October

OC Arirang Harvest Festival

Arirang OC Festival

October

OC Film Fiesta

Media Arts Santa Ana

October

OC International Auto Show

Motor Trend Group, LLC

October

OC Roller Derby Competition

OC Roller Derby 

October

Voter Education Presentation

Orange Coast College

October

Placentia Harvest Festival

Placentia Heritage Festival Committee

October

Relationship Building Network Business Expo

Relationship Building Network, Inc.

October

Arts Celebration: FALL FOR ALL

Segerstrom Center for the Arts

October

Silverado Country Fair & Folk Festival

Silverado Country Fair & Folk Festival

October

Community Engagement Fair

UC Irvine

October

Viet Film Fest

Vietnamese American Arts and Letters Association

October

Western State College Law Voter Registration Drive

Western State College of Law Student Council

November

Delhi Center Anniversary Dinner

Delhi Center

November

Dia de los Muertos

Calacas Inc

November

Golden Future 50+ Expo

Golden Future Expos Inc.

December

Christmas Eve in Mexico-Nochebuena

Chapman University

December

Project Soapbox

Actions Civics CA

December

Winter Wonderland

City of Irvine

Mobile Fleet

Popup Voting Station

Vote Center Newsletter

Vote Center Newsletter Page 1 Vote Center Newsletter Page 2

Publications

Public Notice for August 8, 2019 Consultation Meeting

PUBLIC NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that a Consultation Meeting for the Development of the Draft Election Administration Plan Pursuant to the Voter’s Choice Act will be held on August 8, 2019. This hearing is for interested residents, representatives from the disability community and community organizations and individuals that advocate on behalf of, or provide services to, individuals with disabilities and for representatives, advocates, and other stakeholders of the county's language communities.

Notice is further given that the Orange County Registrar of Voters Neal Kelley invites interested representatives of the County's language communities and disability communities to provide consultation and input on the development of the County's draft Election Administration Plan (EAP). All interested parties are encouraged to attend the meeting on August 8, 2019 from 1:30 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Orange County Registrar of Voters, 1300 South Grand Avenue, Building C, Santa Ana, CA 92705.

Notice is further given that the location is an accessible facility. Requests for documents in accessible formats, interpreting services, assistive listening devices, or other accommodations should be made by calling (714) 567-5106, no later than four working days prior to the meeting.

Dated this 17th day of July, 2019.

Neal Kelley
Registrar of Voters

Public Notice for August 29, 2019 Public Hearing

PUBLIC NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that a Public Hearing for the Draft Election Administration Plan pursuant to the Voter’s Choice Act will be held on August 29, 2019.

Notice is further given that the Draft Election Administration Plan is posted on the Registrar of Voters’ website at ocvote.com/eap. The Plan is available in English and translated versions in Spanish, Vietnamese, Chinese, Korean, Tagalog, and Farsi (Persian) will be subsequently posted in accordance with federal and state law.

Comments on the Plan may be submitted using the online comment form on the Registrar of Voters’ website (ocvote.com/eap), by email to ocvoter@rov.ocgov.com, in writing, or in person at the Public Hearing. Written comments should be addressed to the Orange County Registrar of Voters, 1300 S. Grand Avenue, Building C, Santa Ana, CA 92705.

Meeting Date: August 29, 2019

Meeting Time: 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Meeting Location: Orange County Department of Education

200 Kalmus Drive

Costa Mesa, CA 92626

The Public Hearing will also be livestreamed online at ocvote.com/eap.

For more information regarding the Public Hearing, please call 714-567-7600 or visit ocvote.com/eap.

Notice is further given that the location is an accessible facility. Requests for documents in accessible formats, interpreting services, assistive listening devices, or other accommodations should be made by calling (714) 567-5106, no later than four working days prior to the meeting.

Dated this 9th day of August, 2019.

Neal Kelley

Registrar of Voters

[1] Advancing Justice 2018 Poll Monitor Report OC (Page 11). Asian Americans Advancing Justice – Los Angeles.