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Prop 14 FAQs

How Does Proposition 14 Affect the Primary Election?

• Proposition 14 provides for a “voter-nominated Primary Election” for each state elective office and congressional office in California, in which a voter may vote for any candidate for these offices without regard to the political party preference (formerly known as “party affiliation”) disclosed by either the candidate or the voter.

• The top two candidates receiving the two highest vote totals for each “voter-nominated” office at a Primary Election, regardless of party preference, would then compete for the office at the ensuing General Election.

 


Can More Than One Candidate For a “Voter-Nominated” Office with the Same Party Preference Participate in the General Election?

Yes, the top two candidates receiving the two highest vote totals for each “voter-nominated” office will then compete for office at the ensuing General Election, regardless of party.

 


Has Proposition 14 Created an “Open Primary Election”?

No, Proposition 14 only allows a voter to vote for any candidate for voter-nominated offices without regard to the political party preference.

 


What Are the “Voter-Nominated” Offices for a Primary Election?

“Voter-nominated” offices for a Primary Election are: Member of the United States Senate; Member of Congress; State Constitutional offices; Member of the State Senate; and, Member of the State Assembly.

 


Is a Candidate Whose Name Will Appear on the General Election Ballot Considered the Official Nominee of Any Political Party for That “Voter-Nominated” Office?

• No, a candidate for a “voter-nominated” office shall not be deemed to be the official nominee of any political party for that office.

• A candidate for a “voter-nominated” office may have his/her party preference listed on the ballot. However, this is shown for the information of the voter only.

• In addition, no party is entitled to have a candidate with its party preference designation participate in a General Election unless such candidate is one of the two candidates receiving the highest or second-highest number of votes cast at the Primary Election.

 


Can the Voter Obtain Information on the Party Preferences of Candidates for “Voter-Nominated” Offices?

• A candidate for "voter-nominated" offices must state his or her political party preference, or lack of party preference, indicated upon the ballot for that office.  

• A candidate for “voter-nominated” office must provide his/her party preference history for the preceding 10 years when he/she files his/her Declaration of Candidacy. Voters may obtain this party preference history on the Secretary of State’s and Registrar of Voters’ websites.

 


Can No Party Preference Voters (Formerly Known as Decline-to-State Voters) Cast a Vote for “Voter-Nominated” Contests in the Statewide Direct Primary Election?

Yes, No Party Preference voters may cast votes for “voter-nominated” candidates, regardless of the candidates’ party preferences. “Voter-nominated” contests will be included on nonpartisan ballots, in addition to nonpartisan contests.

 


Can No Party Preference Voters Cast a Vote for “Party-Nominated/Partisan” Contests in the Statewide Direct Primary Election?

It might be possible only in a Presidential Primary Election. To be able to do so, a political party must agree to allow a voter who has declined to disclose a party preference to vote the ballot of that political party at the Statewide Direct Primary Election. The political party must provide a written notice to the Secretary of State for this to happen.

 


Will a Voter be Allowed to Cast a Vote for a Qualified “write-in” Candidate for a “Voter-Nominated Contest”?

A voter may vote for a qualified write-in candidate for a “voter-nominated” contest in the Presidential Primary Election. •A person whose name has been written on the ballot as a write-in candidate at the General Election for a “voter-nominated” office shall not be counted.