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Orange County Elections
Orange County Elections

Registrar of Voters promotes voter registration with Secretary of State

September 23, 2016 - On Tuesday, September 27th, Registrar of Voters Neal Kelley will appear with California Secretary of State Alex Padilla at Cal State Fullerton to promote voter registration.

In 2008, 6 million Americans didn't vote because they missed a registration deadline or didn't know how to register. In 2016, we want to make sure no one is left out - on September 27, 2016, volunteers, celebrities, and organizations from all over the country will "hit the streets" for National Voter Registration Day.

18-24 year old citizens have been registering in record numbers, but they are not turning out to cast ballots in the same numbers. This event will be focused on not only registering voters, but motivating young people to turn out and vote.

The Registrar of Voters is co-sponsoring a concert on campus by the local band Ceasefire – stop by our booth to register to vote, learn about the upcoming election, or volunteer. Make sure your voice is heard!

The concert and event will be located on the campus of Cal State Fullerton at 800 North State College Blvd., Fullerton (in the campus dining center area).

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Orange County Elections
Orange County Elections

Follow up to award winning election documentary coming soon

September 17, 2016 - A new film is coming soon that will shed light on the intensity of producing elections. The seed of this story, Blueprints for Democracy: How We Vote, lies in the incredible details required to place a candidate on a ballot, produce that ballot and count votes.  This follow up to the award-winning documentary, What it Takes to Count: Inside an Orange County Election, dives even further into the myriad of details involved in producing elections.  The sheer scale of logistics required in order to ensure a fair and accurate election often bewilders the public, which becomes clear as the film unfolds.  A surreal combination of back-breaking work, complex problem solving, fighting deadlines and even an unplanned power outage is revealed as Orange County, CA election officials work to bring democracy to its citizens.  At a time when the eyes of the world are focused on elections, it's a timely reminder of just how much is done to protect our precious votes.

You can watch the trailer for the new film here.

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Orange County Registrar of Voters Logo
Orange County Elections
Orange County Elections

Get Ready for Some Polling Place Changes

September 16, 2016 - There's about to be some changes in the Orange County polling place landscape. Why? It all comes down to jurisdictions moving from at-large elections to district based elections. For instance, many school districts and cities are moving from legislative bodies being elected from throughout the jurisdiction to individual, carved out districts. This creates more areas where ballot types cross, creating the need for new polling places. Voters who have been used to going to a specific polling place for years may find that their polling place has changed. It takes just a second to look on the back of your sample ballot, which will display the name and location of your polling place. These booklets will begin to mail on September 29th.

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Orange County Elections
Orange County Elections

Rock the Vote and Surfing? Unique OC Voter Event Returns Soon

August 22, 2016 - In our third partnership with the national organization, Rock the Vote, we will be hosting a special concert on the beach Saturday, September 17th at noon as a part of our "Surf the Vote" event. The concert features Orange County band Bristol to Memory, which has donated their time to get the message out about the upcoming November general election. The concert is free and will take place at Aliso Creek Beach, 31131 S. Pacific Coast Hwy., Laguna Beach (details on parking can be found on the OC Parks website).

We will be registering voters and signing up volunteers for the November election. Stop by from noon to 3 p.m.! Additional information coming as we get closer to the event.
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Orange County Elections
Orange County Elections

390 and Counting (ballot types that is)

August 21, 2016 - We are currently at 390 ballot types. What's a ballot type? These are the unique ballot "styles" that will be found throughout Orange County for the November 8th General Election. Depending on where you live will determine your ballot type - for instance you may have specific contests on your ballot (such as city council, school district, water district and special districts) while your friend in another city will have a ballot that looks completely different. Take all of these and multiply them by the 9 languages that we support and you can imagine how many thousands of documents we must format, proof, print and distribute. Happy voting!

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Orange County Elections
Orange County Elections

Random Alphabet Draw: Order of Candidates Determined

August 18, 2016 - For every election a random draw of letters is conducted, which is then used to determine the order that candidates will be listed on the ballot. Today a random draw was conducted by the Secretary of State - here's the order:

1. O, 2. K, 3. W, 4. Q, 5. V, 6. S, 7. D, 8. R, 9. N, 10. H, 11. U, 12. E, 13. X, 14. A, 15. P, 16. I, 17. Z, 18. C, 19. G, 20. L, 21. F, 22. Y, 23. T, 24. M, 25. B, 26. J

The alphabet is applied throughout the candidate's entire last name, so if more than one candidate's surname begins with the same letter, the second letter of the surname determines who goes first.

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Orange County Elections
Orange County Elections

From J to TT - November Election Measure Letters

August 15, 2016 - Friday was the deadline for cities, school districts, special districts, and other jurisdictions to decide if they wanted to place a measure or item on the November 8th ballot.  We have a record number of measures for a general election (33 in fact - this does not include state propositions, which total 17).  Registrar of Voters Neal Kelley assigns the letters (generally starting with the last letter used in the previous election) - in this case "I" was the last letter used in June, so we begin with "J".  With so many measures we end up at "TT". A complete list of the measures and their assigned letter can be found on our website.

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Orange County Elections
Orange County Elections

June 7th Presidential Primary Election final ballot counting complete and certified

June 27, 2016 – Registrar of Voters Neal Kelley has just certified the official results of the Presidential Primary Election held on June 7, 2016 (final ballot counting was complete Friday evening).

Total turnout from the election was 49.6% with 29.2% of voters casting their ballot by mail and 20.3% of voters voting in their polling place. In the 2012 Presidential Primary overall turnout was 26.5%, vote-by-mail voting was 17.5% and polling place voting was 9.0%.

The Orange County Registrar of Voters produces detailed reports focusing on overall turnout, turnout by precinct, turnout by districts, turnout by cities, and more. These detailed reports can be found in the "Results" section by visiting ocvote.com.

 
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Orange County Elections
Orange County Elections

Why does it take weeks to count ballots? The journey of a single ballot

June 18, 2016 - It's not widely known among the public that election officials in California have 30 days to complete ballot counting following Election Day. Why so long? Volume, volume, volume. Take for instance the journey of a single "ballot" - here's how it unfolds:

  1. "Ballot" is received by us through the USPS
  2. "Ballot", along with tens of thousands, begins a journey in its envelope through a high-speed scanner, which will "take a picture" of the back of the envelope that contains the voter's signature
  3. "Ballot" is then set aside in a holding pattern while files of all of the digital images are prepared for review
  4. "Ballot" image is then sent to dozens of operators who will look at the signature on the envelope (four at a time on a screen by the way) and compare it to the signature we have on file from the original voter registration
  5. "Ballot" is rejected in the initial review because the signature does not match - the data is held along with tens of thousands of other ballots
  6. "Ballot" comes out of the holding pattern and back through the high speed scanners, still in its sealed envelope, where the barcode is now scanned, along with, you guessed it - tens of thousands of other ballots
  7. "Ballot" is out-sorted to its own bin because it needs to go to a second tier review for a closer examination of the signature
  8. "Ballot" travels in a tray, along with other ballots, to the second tier for review
  9. "Ballot" sits for a bit because the second tier review takes time - any voter would want that to ensure a valid ballot is counted
  10. "Ballot" is determined eligible in the system and heads back to the high-speed scanners
  11. "Ballot" is put through the high-speed scanner again but this time the barcode signals to move the ballot to a "good" bin, which outsorts it for opening
  12. "Ballot" moves in a tray to a series of automated openers, which splits the envelope open and automatically extracts the ballot, while staying with its fellow ballots from its own precinct
  13. "Ballot" moves, along with tens of thousands, to a sorting station where the "ballot" is flattened by hand in preparation for scanning
  14. "Ballot" is moved to a second sorting station where it is placed in "batches" for scanning, but not before one last check is made for any staples, or paper clips, or other items that could damage a scanner
  15. "Ballot" is scanned at high speed along with thousands of other ballots, where properly marked votes are automatically tallied by voting system
  16. "Ballot" barcode was accidentally marked through by the voter so scanner rejects the ballot on the first pass
  17. "Ballot" is pulled later due to the reject and heads into the manual duplication room
  18. "Ballot" votes are placed onto a blank ballot, with good barcodes (the barcodes are needed to orient the ballot from top to bottom and left to right, to ensure it is read properly)
  19. "Ballot" goes back into scan room and is scanned and read properly, recording the vote
  20. Data from "ballot" is extracted from data card and placed into Tally system for addition into total votes cast
  21. "Ballot" vote shows up as one of tens of thousands of votes online for the public to see.


Multiply this times hundreds of thousands, do the math on the time, and now you understand why it takes weeks to count ballots. This system has evolved over decades through laws, regulations and efficient operations to ensure precise counting of every vote is tallied. This is proven every election through multiple layers of audits on a federally and state certified system.

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Orange County Elections
Orange County Elections

Process of pulling ballots critical to final ballot accounting

June 17, 2016 - This post focuses on just one aspect of the extreme level of detail required after every election. We are currently in the process of "pulling" rejected ballots. A rejected ballot occurs for a couple of reasons - for instance, during the scanning process the second page of a two-page ballot is missing (they can become separated during the ballot preparation process or voters may mail in the second page if they forgot to send it initially). We must search for every missing second page to ensure the entire ballot is counted. In addition, if our scanners cannot read the barcode on a ballot (which is required to orient the ballot) then it will "reject" it - we must find every one of these "rejects" in order to scan them in and tally the votes. 

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